EU reaches stalemate over Agency Workers Directive

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. The European Union has reached an impasse over the future of thecontroversial Agency Workers Directive, after a crucial meeting last weekfailed to reach an agreement. The various European nations are currently at loggerheads over thedirective, with Britain, Germany, Ireland and Denmark all looking forconcessions. The current draft of the directive would see employers forced to offertemporary workers the same employment conditions as permanent staff from dayone of employment. They would also be entitled to the same salary after asix-week qualification period. It is this qualification period that is causing the split. The Department ofTrade and Industry (DTI) is pushing for a return to the original position of aone-year qualification period, or anything above six weeks. Employers and the Government fear the directive would damage the UK labourmarket’s flexibility by making it less attractive to hire temps due to increasedred tape. The draft will probably now remain with the Council of Ministers, forfurther discussion, into the period when the Italian presidency of the EUstarts on 1 July. If a consensus still can’t be reached, it could become bogged down for aslong as a year before moving to the European Parliament for ratification,although this is thought unlikely. David Yeandle, deputy director of employment policy at the EngineeringEmployers Federation (EEF), said employers would be pleased with the UK Government’srobust line, despite intense pressure from Europe to get a resolution. “The fact they didn’t reach agreement shows there is a big gap betweenwhat the different countries want. In theory, it could be with the Council ofMinisters for as long as it takes,” he said. However, TUC general secretary Brendan Barber accused the Government ofscuppering decent pay and basic rights for agency workers. By Ross Wigham Previous Article Next Article EU reaches stalemate over Agency Workers DirectiveOn 10 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

Emerson to supply monitoring technology for $3.3bn Tyra field redevelopment project

first_img Image: Emerson’s wellhead pressure monitoring technology will enhance safety during the Tyra redevelopment project. Photo: courtesy of Total E&P Denmark. Total E&P Denmark has awarded a contract to Emerson to provide wellhead pressure monitoring technology for the $3.3bn Tyra gas field redevelopment project in the Danish part of the North Sea.Under the contract, Emerson will provide more than 200 Rosemount wireless pressure transmitters for installation on the four riser platforms of the redevelopment project, which aims to extend the life of Tyra field, which has been in production for more than 30 years.According to Total E&P Denmark, the Tyra gas field is currently facing seabed subsidence, reducing the air gap between the sea level and the bottom of the platforms.In order to maintain production at the field, Total will install new and elevated topsides supported by 13m high jacket extensions on top of the existing jacket structures, replacing the existing wellhead platforms.Emerson’s technology will monitor wellhead casing pressuresAs part of the two-year redevelopment project, Total E&P Denmark will use Emerson’s technology to monitor wellhead casing pressures as a safety measure during the installation of replacement platforms and topsides.The Rosemount wireless pressure transmitters will transmit data to two Emerson DeltaV PK controllers that will be installed on the accommodation platforms.The transmitted data will be presented to construction workers locally and relayed to an onshore monitoring point, Emerson noted.Emerson Automation Solutions Europe president Roel van Doren said: “Emerson’s wireless technology has been successfully deployed within offshore applications around the world, helping improve the safety of people and operations.“The ability to offer a complete solution capable of providing real-time measurement and awareness to help Total monitor and respond to pressure changes safely was a key factor in the use of Emerson technology.”Emerson said that the lack of availability of power and cable infrastructure, a wireless and battery-powered solution will be needed to monitor the wellhead pressure.Earlier this year, Semco Maritime secured EPCI contract for the Tyra redevelopment project.Under the contract, Semco Maritime will be responsible for preparatory engineering work after which it will undertake system installation on five unmanned satellite platforms at the Tyra complex.Upon completion of the redevelopment project, the Tyra field is expected to produce more than 200 million barrels of oil equivalent. Emerson’s wellhead pressure monitoring technology will be used to enhance safety during the Tyra redevelopment project last_img read more

Cocaine found at OUSU HQ

first_imgEvidence of cocaine use has been discovered in the Oxford Union and OUSU offices. Cocaine-detecting swabs used to wipe flat surfaces in the toilets in Oxford University Students’ Union’s Bonn Square offices tested positive, as did swabs in five of the eight cubicles tested in the Oxford Union. The OUSU building is leased by the University and the third floor houses the staff of The Oxford Student and Oxide radio alongside the sabbatical offices of OUSU staff. The cocaine swabs were used to wipe a ledge by the sink and the back of both toilet cisterns in the third floor bathrooms, revealing traces of the class A drug. OUSU President Martin McCluskey said he was shocked by the results of the tests, saying “I can’t quite believe it.” He continued, “I’m surprised. The building is used by hundreds of people each week… There are more people from the OxStu and Oxide here than sabs [OUSU sabbatical officers].” Hannah Kuchler, editor of the Oxford Student, whose offices share a bathroom with the student union, also argued that the toilets were freely accessible, saying, “Jacari, UCU, the fucking Lecturers’ Union. Anyone could use it.” McCluskey added, “I can assure you that it wasn’t an OUSU sab. We don’t have a policy towards drug use, but we’re zero tolerance. The security in this building isn’t fantastic, sometimes the doors are open at weekends.” He emphasised that he trusted OUSU’s sabbatical staff, saying, “we spend a lot of time together and I’m sure they’re not cocaine users.” The current President suggested that the offices were regularly used by people not involved with the Student Union, saying, “Oxide and the OxStu combined bring in more people than OUSU… We’ve got non-students based here, too.” McCluskey did not, however, give any indication that OUSU’s security arrangements would change in the near future: “There’s very little we can actually do. This is a University building, not an OUSU building.” Tests also revealed traces of the illegal drug at the Oxford Union. Swabs turned up positive results in over half of the eight cubicles tested in the Oxford Union, and several students have admitted to using the drug on the premises. The tests at the Oxford Union were conducted on two separate occasions: after President’s Drinks on a Thursday evening, and on a weekday afternoon. One Oxford Union member, who preferred to remain anonymous, commented on the results. He said, “there are certain people, some quite senior, who definitely engage in drug use. I personally really dislike it. I don’t doubt that it happens.” Another student, who also did not wish to be named, said, “it’s probably one of the best places to do coke in Oxford. The toilet cubicles are massive and there are no bouncers.” He added, “there were three of us in a cubicle and no one batted an eyelid. I snorted it off the ledge above the toilet.” Ben Tansey, President of the Oxford Union, described the findings as “really disappointing”. He defended the security arrangements in place, saying, “we have security on the door. They’re briefed to deal with things like that. We search bags sometimes.” However Tansey admitted that, “Obviously it’s hard to police the Union toilets 24/7.” He denied that drug usage was a significant problem, saying, “I’ve never seen anyone do coke in Oxford. I’m quite clearly not in the scene.” Toby Shergold of Thames Valley Police warned that although the tests were positive, the drugs could have been used weeks ago. He said, “we’ve done swabs in some licensed premises across the county, but it’s important to remember that it’s an indicator of drug use. However it’s not something that a premise should be condemned for. “It takes one person to use drugs in that cubicle, for you to take a positive result, in recent weeks. It can be positive from weeks ago. He also stressed that swabs don’t reveal that large numbers of people were taking drugs at a given venue. Shergold said, “these swabs are not an accurate indicator of how much drugs have been taken in a licensed premise. “We have had swabbing operations around the county and if a licensed premise has a positive result, this is a reason to work with them to stop any future drug-taking on their property,” he added. In 2006 a Cherwell investigation found evidence of cocaine in 11 student venues, including the Union and the Bridge.last_img read more

Pearl Jam Will Bring All Five Drummers To Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony

first_imgIn their first year of eligibility, Pearl Jam easily garnered enough votes to find their way into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. With the induction ceremony coming up on April 7th, the band will be honored by another legendary Hall Of Famer – Neil Young. As Pearl Jam regularly covers Young’s music, this will be a meaningful way for the two artists to share their respect for one another.Though, Pearl Jam’s induction has caused controversy among previous drummers who were not in the original or existing lineup. With founding member Dave Krusen and current drummer Matt Cameron in line to be formally inducted – alongside frontman Eddie Vedder, bassist Jeff Ament, and guitarists Stone Gossard and Mike McCready – past drummers Dave Krusen, Matt Chamberlin, Dave Abbruzzese, and Jack Irons were all left out.Abbruzzese expressed his concern to Facebook recently, saying: “I challenge anyone to justify why I am not worthy of a place in the history of Pearl Jam.” The drummer, known for his tenure with PJ from 1991-94, continued, “The official reason given from the RRHOF makes it bullshit. It make my years of hard work appear to be worthless towards the success born of the formative years of Pearl Jam. This is simply not the case. The milestones and the success obtained during my period in the band… The Grammy, AMA’s, MTV Awards, over 20 plus million albums sold. MTV Unplugged performance. SNL twice, etc. Over 275 shows.”He even nudged his former bandmates to do the “right thing.” He says, “They can’t justify ignoring my contributions. Like me or not. If there is still a part of that band that remembers how hard we worked, how much blood and how much sweat … They will do the right thing.”Pearl Jam has officially responded to this matter, recruiting Abbruzzese and all other former drummers to join them at the induction ceremony next month. They write:“While awards and accolades are understandably subjective and a countless number of our peers have yet to be honored, we do feel fortuante to be recognized and provided the opportunity to reunite with everyone who has been part of the group. Specifically the drummers who all left their distinctive mark on our band in the pre-Matt Cameron years.”“Dave Krusen, Matt Chamberlin, Dave Abbruzzese, and Jack Irons are each individually great players who gave their all to the early recordings and live gigs. Looking forward to seeing them and all the other musicians on the bill.”You can read Pearl Jam’s full letter below.The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame goes down April 7th in Brooklyn. A pre-recorded telecast will then air on HBO on April 29th.[H/T CoS]last_img read more

The Economic Value of Data in an Information Driven World

first_imgBy 2024, we’ll have a fully established Information Economy where data is critical to businesses looking to predictively spot new opportunities to gain a competitive edge. Standards-based information will be sold, donated and traded on open exchanges. Data marketplaces will facilitate the transfer of data in and out of siloes more fluidly and people will start to broker their own data.  We’re already seeing many signs of this – but it’s only the beginning.Within this landscape, your company’s data is important – that’s obvious. But just how important is it? How can you measure its value?  Today, we talk about ‘data as the new currency’ and we try to give it a price tag. Typically, data is worth what someone is willing to pay for it.  That simple transactional view does not tell the whole story.As organizations race to make sense of the opportunities and problems associated with our increasingly data driven world, businesses are coping with the need to more accurately measure its true value.But have no fear – it’s not all doom and gloom. Savvy businesses will take note and prepare for the future by ‘architecting for value’ – understanding and creating business and IT valuation processes within the company that reveal the real value of data. Let’s take a look at some examples of new data valuation activities being undertaken by organizations today.Data Becomes Your New Product: A recent report on Big Data’s market disruption by Capgemini and EMC found that 63% of respondents consider that the monetization of data could eventually become as valuable to their organizations as their existing products and services. This speaks volumes about Big Data’s potential – companies that have long sold products for revenue may start generating more revenue from data value than product value. French tennis racket manufacturer Babolat makes a ‘smart racket,’ the Babolat Play, which generates and collects data about a player’s performance on the court. By creating a smart product, Babolat took the first step to data value. This data could become an entirely new revenue stream. Babolat might, for instance, sell this data to app developers looking to make new products and user experiences or sell the data to athletic research organizations for data mining. A tennis racket can only be sold once, but the data it produces has endless monetization potential.Data Valuation for the Worst Case Scenario: Large-scale cyber-breaches are becoming far too frequent, resulting in great financial loss for multiple companies. As a result, data insurance policies are becoming a necessary part of doing business. Working with the insured, data insurance companies have to place value on a data set that not only looks at the value of the data to the insured’s business, but also takes into account the multitude of other factors that happen in the event of a data breach. Customer notifications, reparations and other costs such as PR for damage control all must be factored into the price of insurance. AIG’s CyberEdge, ACE’s Privacy and Network Security, and Lockton’s Cyber & Technology division offer companies coverages in the event of a breach that factor in the nuanced effects.Data in a Digital Bankruptcy: Caesars Entertainment Operating Co., which controls Caesars Palace, Caesars Atlantic City, Harrah’s Reno and more than a dozen regional properties, filed for bankruptcy earlier this year. Interestingly, the most valuable individual asset that creditors are vying for is Caesars’ Total Rewards Loyalty Program, the company’s big-data customer loyalty program that it has built over the last 17 years. It is said to have data on more than 45 million customers.  This data is valued by creditors at $1 billion – that’s a fairly large number. It exceeds the value of any of Caesars’ physical Las Vegas properties, which really puts the value of data in perspective. The program is also said to be 17% of the total value of all Caesars’ operating assets. Since the gaming industry does not have agreed upon valuation policies and practices for data, the value of the Total Rewards Loyalty Program will be contested in court and could result in interesting rulings around data valuation.Data Deals; Mergers and Acquisitions: Data is now one of the primary assets companies are after in an M&A, in some cases more so than the people, IP, or real estate.  In LinkedIn’s recent acquisition of Lynda.com, data was likely the biggest asset to come along with the acquisition price. LinkedIn’s CEO Jeff Weiner made note of Lynda.com’s extensive library of premium video as a compelling reason to buy the company, meaning that LinkedIn was after Lynda.com’s data assets to augment its professional network. Out of the $1.5 billion, it’s likely that a significant portion went toward the purchase of video data assets.Information Economy for a Better World: The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) aims to develop pharmaceutical and diagnostic targets in cancer by making it easy to share genetic data. This collaboration of NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute in essence looks to code genomic data so that standards-based, common data elements can be shared through open-source infrastructure.To succeed in the Information Economy, an organization must place data at the heart of everything that they do, every day. Businesses have to prioritize data valuation for technical and business-driven content throughout the organization. They must make it part of their business strategy by developing tools for valuation and policies and services to acquire or sell data. In order to leap ahead in this new world, companies must remain focused on honing their ability to achieve data-driven insights by predictively spotting new opportunities.Some start-ups and traditional organizations are already making headway in this arena.  For others, it’s not too late. But as the Information Economy takes shape in the years ahead, those that move too slowly will not survive.  The race is on – don’t be left behind.last_img read more

US terrorism alert warns of politically motivated violence

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The Homeland Security Department has issued a national terrorism bulletin warning of the lingering potential for violence from people motivated by anti-government sentiment after President Joe Biden’s election. The bulletin suggests the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol may embolden extremists and set the stage for additional attacks. The department isn’t citing a specific threat. But DHS points to “a heightened threat environment across the United States” that it believes “will persist” for weeks after Biden took office. The wording suggests national security officials see a thread between recent violence over the past year motivated by antigovernment grievances, whether over COVID-19 restrictions, the 2020 election results or police use of force.last_img read more

Researchers publish cross-disciplinary biological study

first_imgIn a cross-disciplinary effort, Notre Dame biology and mathematics professors have published a study on stathmin, a key protein in the cytoskeleton, demonstrating the success of mathematical computer modeling and lab work in photographing of stathmin.Notre Dame associate professor of biochemistry Holly Goodson recently published the study in conjunction with professor of applied mathematics Mark Alber. “Mark Alber’s lab specializes in doing biological modeling and they had already approached us about the possibility of trying to put something together with this,” Goodson said. “We’ve actually been working on this for quite a long time. The models had to start very simply and we’ve built complexity over time.”In developing the mathematical model, Goodson said the goal was to create a system that was not overly complex. “The first thing we’re looking for is just general behavior,” she said. “Then you can add extra levels of details to make it more precise. One of the main things you can get out of something like this is to figure out what really matters.”Using computational models in a systems biology approach indirectly tests and observes conceptual models of the dynamic subcellular system, Goodson said. Although electron microscopes can capture images nanometers in size, such pictures are often incomplete, she said.“It’s like trying to understand a football game: if you’re trying to figure out football from a hundred random snapshots of the game, you would never see anything interesting,” Goodson said. “You would never see a touchdown, it would never happen. That’s kind of like electron microscopy: it’s hard to figure out what’s really going from these snapshots frozen in time.”Stathmin plays a crucial role in the destruction and uptake of microtubules, Goodson said, a dynamic, continuous process that is difficult to track. Her lab formulated conceptual ideas for the mechanism of this process, Goodman said, and obtained only limited evidence by traditional biochemical means.“It was frustrating because we couldn’t really figure out how to test if these ideas were correct,” Goodson said. “It goes back to the saying that you don’t really understand something until you can predict it quantitatively. “It’s too complicated a system to write down mathematical models — all we really know is how the individual pieces interact, but we don’t really know how that would give rise to specific predictions about the behavior of the system other than that ‘it grows’ or ‘it falls apart.’”Goodson said she studied computational biology as a rotation student working on modeling protein ­folding in the lab of Michael Levitt, one of the winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.Goodson said she believes computational and inter­disciplinary approaches are the way of the future in biology, as shown by joint efforts of Notre Dame’s biochemistry and mathematics departments.“This is an example of why it’s important for people in a variety of sciences to be learning something about biology because there’s a lot of science that’s going to be done in the next 20 years or so at this interface between biology and the other sciences,” she said.Tags: Biological Modelinglast_img read more

Public Service and Outreach Awards

first_imgAthens, Ga. — Ronnie Barentine, extension coordinator for Dooly County, has spent the last three decades developing ways to make Georgia’s largest industry more efficient and profitable. He’s also made it more sustainable. Barentine will receive the Walter Barnard Hill Distinguished Public Service Fellow Award at the University of Georgia’s 2013 Public Service and Outreach Meeting and Awards Luncheon. The award is named for the chancellor who led UGA from 1899 until his death in 1905. It is UGA’s highest honor for public service faculty. Barentine served as extension coordinator in Pulaski County before moving to Dooly County in January. He has helped farmers in south Georgia implement cover crop rotations and other traditional organic farming techniques to help raise peanut and cotton yields in the face of repeated seasons of drought and rising fertilizer costs. “This is big commercial agriculture,” Barentine said. “We’re taking what they’ve been doing in home gardens and landscaping for a longtime and just applying it on a larger scale.” Barentine worked with Hawkinsville farmer Barry Martin for 17 years to develop a cover crop planting systems using rye and clover, which preserves soil moisture, helps control pesticide-resistant pig weed and reduces farmers’ fertilizer needs. Through trial, error and constant tweaking, Barentine and Martin worked together to make cutting-edge research work in the field. The research won Martin acclaim as one of the most sustainable peanut farmers in the nation and helped to convince other farmers of the benefits of low-till farming and cover crop use. Barentine was recognized for his work in 2011 with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences D.W. Brooks Award. He is currently studying the uses of clover as a cover crop in row crop farming. He’s hopeful the variety of clover he is studying will save farmers about $50 an acre. Barentine was elected southern vice chair of the National County Agents Association’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Committee. In 2009, he won the Walter Barnard Hill Award for Distinguished Achievement in University Public Service and Outreach. In addition to Barentine’s award, three other UGA Cooperative Extension employees will be honored at the luncheon. John Worley, Extension engineer and associate professor in the UGA Department of Poultry Science John Worley, an associate professor and extension engineer in the CAES poultry science department, and Lori Purcell Bledsoe, 4-H program development coordinator in the Northwest Cooperative Extension District, will take home Walter Barnard Hill Awards for Distinguished Achievement in University Public Service and Outreach. The award recognizes outstanding contributions to the improvement of the quality of life in Georgia or elsewhere. Worley has developed numerous programs to address the needs of Georgians and the agricultural community in areas such as animal waste management, energy conservation and more. For the past several year’s he has specialized in making broiler production more efficient by helping farmers weatherize their poultry houses and use energy more efficiently. In 2012, he received a $100,000 USDA grant to continue a program that allows UGA to provide discounted energy audits to poultry farmers. The audits were necessary for the farmers to receive government assistance to update their chicken houses. At that time he and his team had provided audits for almost 200 farms with over 1,000 poultry houses. “There’s just tremendous potential there, so we’ve tried to fill that need (for energy efficiency,” Worley said. “There are about 12,000 broiler houses in Georgia.” Lori Purcell Bledsoe, 4-H program development coordinator for the Northwest Extension District Lori Purcell Bledsoe is responsible for directing 4-H programming efforts in 39 counties. She has served in this position for 10 years. Bledsoe is a lifelong 4-H’er, joining her local 4-H club as a child before becoming a camp counselor, a county 4-H agent and eventually a district program development coordinator. She has recently completed her term as president of the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents, where she represented 3,600 4-H professionals. “Not only has she impacted the lives of thousands of children through her work in Northwest District 4-H, she has also implemented new programs and provided a important connection between the state 4-H staff and other program development coordinators in all of the districts,” said Greg Price, Northwest District Extension director. She is the first Georgia 4-H staff member to receive a Hill award. Linda Rhodes, administrative specialist with UGA Extension’s Southeast District Linda Rhodes, an administrative specialist in the UGA Extension’s Southeast District, will receive the Public Service and Outreach Staff Award for Excellence. This award honors outstanding effort and workplace creativity and innovation, and celebrates the achievements of public service and outreach staff. Rhodes is the second member of the state Extension administrative staff to win this award. In addition to her duties as an assistant to the district director, Rhodes coordinates the USG Tuition Assistance Program for Southeast District Extension employees pursuing bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She received her master’s degree using the Tuition Assistance Program afforded full-time benefits eligible employees, and now uses that first hand knowledge to help others in her district. “Linda serves a vital role in keeping Southeast District moving smoothly,”said Joann L. Milam, Southeast Extension District director. She makes my job easier. Linda is often the ground breaker for new ideas that are used in the other district offices in the state. The Extension agents in our district know that she is the go to person for the Tuition Assistance Program as well as the ins and outs of dossier preparation. We are very proud that her work and skills have been recognized.”last_img read more

Paraguayan and Bolivian Armed Forces Fight Mosquito-borne Diseases

first_imgRainfall in the region has been some of the heaviest on record, according to meteorologists. The problem has been particularly acute in Bolivia, where flooding in the lowland plains of the Amazon has left destruction and wet conditions in its wake – perfect breeding grounds for disease-spreading mosquitos. This effort has been coordinated by Paraguay’s National Malaria Eradication Services (SENEPA), in cooperation with the Ministry of Public Health and Social Welfare. By Dialogo April 03, 2015 As the Bolivian Army continues its efforts, the Paraguayan Armed Forces are working as part of a national campaign to fight dengue and chikungunya in their country. “Even working under the coordination of other institutions, the important thing is to work together for the well-being of all Paraguayans no matter who they are.” “There are more cases [than usual] because the mosquito Aedes aegypti has multiplied due to the recent rains and…people who allow water to accumulate,” said Roberto Torres, Director of Epidemiology in the department of Santa Cruz. Emergency action in Bolivia “Also, with the individuals’ permission, we can enter houses to check for possible larvae and help in cleaning and destroying disease vectors.” Soldiers of the First Division are helping with that effort, for example by maintaining security and supporting the cleaning campaign in the city of Cobija. They’ve done everything from protecting shelters to cleaning up educational facilities, streets and the homes of affected families, according to Colonel Ramiro Mojica Aparicio, Commander of the First Division. Response efforts in Bolivia have focused on the most populated areas of Santa Cruz, where more than 20,000 breeding grounds have been found. There, the Health Services Department (SEDES) is coordinating efforts by the Army and the municipal police forces to fight the diseases. Additionally, other Army personnel are working alongside doctors of the program “Mi salud,” who have conducted more than 60,000 home visits in March to distribute larvicies for mosquito control. The Paraguayan and Bolivian Armed Forces are contributing to campaigns in their respective countries to fight mosquito-borne illnesses, including dengue and chikungunya fevers. As the Bolivian Army continues its efforts, the Paraguayan Armed Forces are working as part of a national campaign to fight dengue and chikungunya in their country. Meanwhile, Soldiers of the Regiment of the Military Police School 2 “Lieutenant Rubén Amézaga Faure”, in Santa Cruz, are taking part in the awareness campaign against the spread of the diseases. Launched the first week in March with the participation of 65 Soldiers and three instructors, the effort involved dicrect contact with the population of Santa Cruz, to educate them on the importance of destroying mosquito breeding sites. Neither disease is typically fatal given timely treatment, but both have extremely severe symptoms, including fever, joint pain, and rash. Chikungunya can also be accompanied by a rash, vomiting and diarrhea, while symptoms for dengue include muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes, and exhaustion. Consequently, both countries have reported dangerous levels of the disease. In Paraguay, 514 patients have been detected as infected with the chikungunya virus, and 780 with dengue, according to the Ministry of Public Health. Meanwhile, authorities have declared an orange alert in Bolivia, having detected 258 cases of chikungunya since January. Cooperative action in Paraguay Soldiers from the Bolivian Army 8th Division, for example, are conducting fumigations in schools, hospitals, parks and houses to stop the breeding; in the department of Tarija, Army units are also conducting a fumigation campaign in coordination with SEDES technical staff and various Mayors’ offices. “Also, with the individuals’ permission, we can enter houses to check for possible larvae and help in cleaning and destroying disease vectors.” “These campaigns highlighted the interagency coordination,” the Army reported. “They were conducted with the direct involvement of SEDES of Villamontes, Yacuiba, the Department Government and the Honorable Municipal Mayor of Yacuiba.” This effort has been coordinated by Paraguay’s National Malaria Eradication Services (SENEPA), in cooperation with the Ministry of Public Health and Social Welfare. “The Armed Forces are present wherever we are needed, all the more so when it involves a question of the public’s health,” said Military Forces social communications director Colonel Jorge Mieres. Consequently, both countries have reported dangerous levels of the disease. In Paraguay, 514 patients have been detected as infected with the chikungunya virus, and 780 with dengue, according to the Ministry of Public Health. Meanwhile, authorities have declared an orange alert in Bolivia, having detected 258 cases of chikungunya since January. center_img Response efforts in Bolivia have focused on the most populated areas of Santa Cruz, where more than 20,000 breeding grounds have been found. There, the Health Services Department (SEDES) is coordinating efforts by the Army and the municipal police forces to fight the diseases. Rainfall in the region has been some of the heaviest on record, according to meteorologists. The problem has been particularly acute in Bolivia, where flooding in the lowland plains of the Amazon has left destruction and wet conditions in its wake – perfect breeding grounds for disease-spreading mosquitos. “The Armed Forces are present wherever we are needed, all the more so when it involves a question of the public’s health,” said Military Forces social communications director Colonel Jorge Mieres. Neither disease is typically fatal given timely treatment, but both have extremely severe symptoms, including fever, joint pain, and rash. Chikungunya can also be accompanied by a rash, vomiting and diarrhea, while symptoms for dengue include muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes, and exhaustion. A significant part of the Army’s efforts involves the hard work of cleaning and sanitizing potential breeding sites left by flooding in the region. About 28,044 families have been affected by flooding since last October, according to then-Minister of Defense Jorge Ledezma, a number that includes 32 deaths and six persons unaccounted for. Meanwhile, a state of emergency has been declared in the departments of La Paz, Chuquisaca and Pando, and Beni is under an orange alert. “Even working under the coordination of other institutions, the important thing is to work together for the well-being of all Paraguayans no matter who they are.” The Paraguayan and Bolivian Armed Forces are contributing to campaigns in their respective countries to fight mosquito-borne illnesses, including dengue and chikungunya fevers. In response, the Ministry of Health sent 11 medicat brigades to work on the prevention of the spread of the Chikungunya virus in the area, primarily through inspections and the use of biolarvicides to destroy mosquito eggs and larvae. Soldiers of the First Division are helping with that effort, for example by maintaining security and supporting the cleaning campaign in the city of Cobija. They’ve done everything from protecting shelters to cleaning up educational facilities, streets and the homes of affected families, according to Colonel Ramiro Mojica Aparicio, Commander of the First Division. “These campaigns highlighted the interagency coordination,” the Army reported. “They were conducted with the direct involvement of SEDES of Villamontes, Yacuiba, the Department Government and the Honorable Municipal Mayor of Yacuiba.” Meanwhile, Soldiers of the Regiment of the Military Police School 2 “Lieutenant Rubén Amézaga Faure”, in Santa Cruz, are taking part in the awareness campaign against the spread of the diseases. Launched the first week in March with the participation of 65 Soldiers and three instructors, the effort involved dicrect contact with the population of Santa Cruz, to educate them on the importance of destroying mosquito breeding sites. In response, the Ministry of Health sent 11 medicat brigades to work on the prevention of the spread of the Chikungunya virus in the area, primarily through inspections and the use of biolarvicides to destroy mosquito eggs and larvae. To that end, 200 service members are working in different cities in the department of Central, where the largest number of larval infestations have been found. Their work primarily involves cleaning empty yards where mosquito eggs and larvae have been found, for example by destroying old tires and buckets that might contain water where the larvae can hatch. They’ve also focused these efforts in schools, hospitals, health centers, public transportation terminals, workshops, cemeteries, jails, plazas, sports clubs and spas – all priorities for stopping the spread of disease. “There are more cases [than usual] because the mosquito Aedes aegypti has multiplied due to the recent rains and…people who allow water to accumulate,” said Roberto Torres, Director of Epidemiology in the department of Santa Cruz. Additionally, other Army personnel are working alongside doctors of the program “Mi salud,” who have conducted more than 60,000 home visits in March to distribute larvicies for mosquito control. Cooperative action in Paraguay To that end, 200 service members are working in different cities in the department of Central, where the largest number of larval infestations have been found. Their work primarily involves cleaning empty yards where mosquito eggs and larvae have been found, for example by destroying old tires and buckets that might contain water where the larvae can hatch. They’ve also focused these efforts in schools, hospitals, health centers, public transportation terminals, workshops, cemeteries, jails, plazas, sports clubs and spas – all priorities for stopping the spread of disease. Emergency action in Bolivia Soldiers from the Bolivian Army 8th Division, for example, are conducting fumigations in schools, hospitals, parks and houses to stop the breeding; in the department of Tarija, Army units are also conducting a fumigation campaign in coordination with SEDES technical staff and various Mayors’ offices. A significant part of the Army’s efforts involves the hard work of cleaning and sanitizing potential breeding sites left by flooding in the region. About 28,044 families have been affected by flooding since last October, according to then-Minister of Defense Jorge Ledezma, a number that includes 32 deaths and six persons unaccounted for. Meanwhile, a state of emergency has been declared in the departments of La Paz, Chuquisaca and Pando, and Beni is under an orange alert. It’s is very important that everyone read this alert.last_img read more

Board of Governors candidates present their views, qualifications

first_imgBar Leadership: There are many other issues that challenge our profession. Many are difficult and controversial, and it will require strong leadership and communication skills to effectively engage in the resolution of such problems. Some of the Bar leadership positions I have held are: • ABA, General Practice Section, Non-Profit Organizations Committee chair (1995-96). • Florida Association of Attorney-CPAs vice president (1997 to 2000). • Florida Bar Legal Needs of Children Committee, chair (1993). • Florida Bar, Public Interest Law Section, newsletter editor (1993). • Orange County Bar Law-Related Education Committee, chair (1998 and 1999). I would greatly appreciate your vote. You may contact me at [email protected] Thank you. 11th Circuit, Seat 3 Jerald S. Beer Your Board of Governors representative is your link to the organized Bar. Palm Beach County has three votes out of 52. Make sure your representative has the training and ability to represent your interests with The Florida Bar. My 20 years of practice has encompassed a small firm (two lawyers), a large firm (110 lawyers) and sizes in between (presently 30 lawyers). I have experience as an assistant state attorney as well as significant civil litigation and business experience. I am proud to be a Florida Bar Board Certified tax lawyer. I also serve on various boards of directors, some law related and others community based. I bring a myriad of experiences to draw upon, allowing me to represent all the practicing lawyers in Palm Beach County. In addition to having served in every elected position of the 2,300-member Palm Beach County Bar Association, including president, I served on many Florida Bar committees before I became your elected Board of Governors representative. I have chaired the 15th Judicial Circuit Fee Arbitration Committee, served on the grievance committee (including one term as chair), served three times as an All Bar Conference delegate and as one of your Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors representatives. It has been a privilege to have represented the lawyers of the 15th Judicial Circuit on the Board of Governors since 1997. I have spent a great deal of time traveling around the county to be at meetings of various groups. As my second term as your representative comes to a close, there are still many pervasive issues affecting you through The Florida Bar. We have led the nation in preventing the erosion of core values that the proposal to allow multidisciplinary practices would have allowed, although we have provided some relief to transactional lawyers by allowing ancillary services. Other far-reaching issues remain. How will we handle multijurisdictional issues? Will The Florida Bar continue to remain independent of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation? Is your Board of Governors representative experienced in handling these types of complex issues that affect your livelihood? The practice continues to change as we start the new millennium. The Florida Bar needs visionaries who can deal with these issues, not the old policies of my opponent who has run for the Board of Governors seat seven times on his old-fashioned policies that do not begin to address the serious issues we face. The key to being an effective Board of Governors representative is to be able to think and act responsibly to provide clear and concise analyses of the issues that are presented through the Board of Governors on a wide range of subjects, and to help and protect the members of The Florida Bar. As many of you well know, one of the issues near and dear to my heart has always been fiscal conservatism. To that end, I am the immediate past chair of the Investment Committee of The Florida Bar and continue to serve on that committee, as well as serving on the Budget Committee. While The Florida Bar does a good job in managing its resources, there is always room to make sure our members are getting the best possible service for the lowest possible cost. An annual membership fee increase for the first time since 1991 has been proposed. The increase is mostly a catch-up to the cost of living index. The “real” increase as proposed is $13 per year, which funds many new programs designed to help lawyers. After a lengthy review and analysis, I supported that increase. I will continue to closely monitor the fiscal policies of The Florida Bar to ensure continued good economic performance for our members. It is important that someone who can combine broad life and legal experiences be the one to provide a balanced, focused approach to achieve those goals and have the background and commitment to continue to represent all of your interests. I think I am that person. Ask yourself who has prepared himself to lead and represent the 4,700 Palm Beach County Florida Bar members, not only by words, but by deeds. Whoever you view as best qualified, the recent presidential election has shown that your vote does count. It is most important that you cast your vote when the ballots are sent out. Please make your voice heard in this election. February 15, 2001 Regular News James S. Lupino We, as members of The Florida Bar, want and need experienced and qualified leadership on the Board of Governors. The practice of law has undergone changes in the 23 years since I have been admitted to The Florida Bar, but in the last several years, we have all witnessed significant new challenges to our profession. The Bar is currently facing unprecedented challenges. Among other things, these challenges include multidisciplinary practices which are changing the face of the legal profession, legislative efforts to place regulation of The Florida Bar under the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, the rights of insureds in insurer-paid representations, and efforts to establish multi-jurisdictional admissions. In the next two years, your leadership will be addressing these issues. I believe it is important that you have an effective Board of Governors representative with the experience necessary to represent your interest on all the important issues we face. My Qualifications: I have the experience and the character to be an effective and respected representative. I have been a member of the Board of Governors for the last two years. During that time, I have served on the Disciplinary Review Committee (for two years), the Disciplinary Procedure Committee (as vice-chair this year), the Investment Committee (which I have been appointed to until the year 2002) and the Member Benefits Committee (as chair this year). I have also been assigned as liaison to the Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Section and to the Quality of Life/Stress Management Committee. I have previously served a full term on the Grievance Committee for the 16th Judicial Circuit. Like most of the lawyers in the 16th Judicial Circuit, my practice has been primarily with small firms. Five years ago, I entered into a partnership with Jay Hershoff, Allison DeFoor and Mark Gregg. That firm has evolved to the Hershoff, Lupino and Mulick firm which has a general practice. My Commitment: I will perform my responsibilities honestly, fairly and with common sense. That is the way I run my practice and my life. For the past two years I have been present, active and involved in the meetings of the Board of Governors as well as the Annual, Midyear and General meetings of the Bar and the committees to which I have been assigned. I will continue to participate in that manner. I know and understand the issues we have before us as lawyers. I have attempted over the past two years to keep you informed of the actions taken at the Board of Governors meetings by letters and e-mails to those who requested ongoing updates. I will continue to provide that information by e-mail to anyone who requests same. I am committed to represent the interests of all the lawyers in the 16th Judicial Circuit, both in the private and public sectors, wherever they may practice, be it in Key West and the Lower Keys, the Middle Keys or the Upper Keys. I would greatly appreciate your support and vote, as I believe I have made a valuable contribution to the Board of Governors in the past two years and would like to carry on the efforts that have been initiated. I would consider it a great honor to be elected by you, my colleagues, as your representative to The Florida Bar Board of Governors for the 16th Judicial Circuit. Jiulio Margalli I was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1993 and currently run a small firm with my wife, Andrea Shaye Margalli. As a private practitioner, I keenly understand the pressure on each and every one of us to provide quality service at a competitive price. I believe that one of the most important responsibilities of The Florida Bar is to support each member as we seek to provide quality legal services to our clients, maintain appropriate levels of income for our firms and assist our communities in providing a system of justice. Too often, the Board of Governors has been dominated by representatives of large corporate law firms with little interest in solo practitioners or small firms. If you choose me as your representative, I will seek to change the Bar’s focus in a positive direction. In addition, I will also seek to: (1) allow Florida Bar members flexibility in forming professional relationships with nonlawyers; (2) maintain public control over judicial selection by opposing efforts to expand the merit-retention selection system to the circuit and county bench; and (3) encourage aggressive prosecution of the unlicensed practice of law. In times of increasing competition, rising costs, and greater client demands, it is increasingly important for the Bar to be supportive of solo practitioners and small law firms. I pledge my unwavering support to assist all lawyers in maintaining productive and high quality practices. I greatly appreciate your support. 17th Circuit, Seat 5 (Editor’s Note: This race is to fill the one year left on President-elect Designate Tod Aronovitz’ term. Two other candidates — Amy Furness, Ervin A. Gonzalez, and Michael J. Higer— have filed, but their platform statements had not been received as this Bar News went to press. Filing for this seat closes February 13 and any additional platform statements for this seat will appear in the March 1 News, as well as on the Bar’s website.) John F. Rudy II I would consider it an honor and privilege to be elected by you, my colleagues, as your representative member of The Florida Bar Board of Governors for the 13th Judicial Circuit. Professional Practice I have been a practicing attorney in Hillsborough County for more than 26 years. My legal practice in Florida began with a large Tampa law firm of more than 70 lawyers, MacFarlane, Ferguson, Allison & Kelly. After seven years, I joined with three other like-minded lawyers to form a business and commercial law firm in Tampa, now with more than 32 lawyers, Bush, Ross, Gardner, Warren & Rudy. My practice has focused on the areas of civil and commercial litigation, mediation, and white-collar criminal defense. I have served in the firm as a member of its board of directors, president and chairman of the Trial Practice Section. During my practice, I have also given extensive service to the lawyers of Hillsborough County through the Hillsborough County Bar Association, as a member of its Board of Directors and most recently, as its president-elect and then president. I have also had the pleasure of serving as a member and then chair of the Hillsborough County Bar Association Judicial Evaluation Committee, Judicial Preference Poll Committee, Trial Lawyers Section, Trial by Jury Committee and Military Affairs Committee. I served two terms as a member of the 13th Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee, including one term as its chair. I was one of the founders of the Trial Lawyers Committee, served on its board of directors for four years and was also president. Our bar is in the process of acquiring property to construct its own law center and I am presently the chair of its Building Committee. In July 2000, I was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush, after the untimely demise of our state attorney, to serve as interim state attorney for the 13th Judicial Circuit until my elected successor was sworn in on January 2, 2001. Through my extensive service with the HCBA and Florida Bar, as well as my professional practice, I believe I have gained the knowledge, ability and skills to effectively represent your interests with The Florida Bar. As we continue into the new millennium, there are numerous issues that lawyers will face and which will have a significant, immediate and long lasting impact on our various and diverse practices. Professionalism, integrity, commitment to excellence and service to our profession above our own self-interests must be our goals in improving the public’s image and its perception of attorneys. I am committed to represent and present the interests of all lawyers of the 13th Judicial Circuit. I believe that my actions on your behalf in the past speak louder than any words I may phrase and would thus greatly appreciate your vote. Timon V. Sullivan Circuit Represented: Thirteenth (Hillsborough County). Practice Experience: Civil trial practice involving litigation and trial of personal injury and commercial cases (products liability; life, health and disability insurance; professional negligence). Years of Practice: 21. Firm: Ogden & Sullivan, P.A., 12 lawyer Tampa firm. Personal Data: Born 1954. Attended Jesuit High School, Vanderbilt University (B.A. 1976) and University of Florida, Holland Law Center (J.D. 1979). Married to Diana (Olmo) Sullivan; three sons: Chris (16), David (14), Kevin (11). Bar Experience: Hillsborough County Bar Association (HCBA), 1979-present; HCBA Young Lawyers Board, 1981-84; HCBA Young Lawyers President, 1985-86; Florida Bar Young Lawyers Section Board of Governors, 1986-89; Florida Bar Trial Lawyers Section Executive Council, 1990-93; HCBA Lawyer Magazine Editor, 1991-92; HCBA Board of Directors, 1989-95; HCBA President, 1993-94; 13th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission, 1995-97, chair, 1997. Objectives for Board Service: To represent all the lawyers of the 13th Circuit and their diverse interests on the Board of Governors. To provide the lawyers of the 13th Circuit with access to and a voice in the governance of their profession. I have no “agenda” for service on the Board of Governors other than to work hard to see that the best interests of lawyers in our circuit are protected. My principal concerns include the Bar’s continuing effort to deal with multidisciplinary practice issues. MDP is a fact of life in Europe. Soon that may be the case in Florida and the United States unless we continue to be vigilant in protecting our independence as lawyers. Additionally, I am concerned that we have a lack of diversity in the leadership of The Florida Bar. To truly represent and protect the interests of all Florida lawyers, our Bar leadership must more closely mirror that constituency to the extent possible. I will work to give leadership opportunities to women and minority lawyers who have the time and interest to become involved. After serving as local bar president in 1993-94, I stepped back from the organized Bar for a few years while I built a practice and learned more about the business of law. This perspective will help me, I believe, be a more effective voice for the lawyers of the 13th Circuit on the Board of Governors. 15th Circuit, Seat 2 Jennifer Coberly Background and Type of Practice: Emphasis on employment, international, environmental, and criminal litigation, including numerous trials. Practicing 11 years at Zuckerman, Spaeder, Taylor and Evans; partner since 1998. Graduate of Florida State University (Summa Cum Laude) and Yale Law School. Native of Jacksonville. Goal for Board Service: To provide 11th Circuit members with an active voice that brings the concerns of our many cultures, as well as our many practice areas, to the Board of Governors. To advocate aggressively on the issues of Judicial Selection, Public Image, Diversity, online CLE training and the prevention of jury system destruction through tort reform. Experience: As current chair of The Florida Bar’s Judicial Evaluation Committee, and as a practicing litigator, I recognize the importance of providing judges with feedback from those who appear before them. Initially, evaluation forms were only available through the judges and were only sent out about 20 percent of the time. In order to increase the use of the evaluation process and to make it easier for attorneys to provide such feedback, the committee, under my leadership, has made it possible for Bar members to obtain the evaluation forms over the Internet or by calling The Florida Bar. We have arranged for this availability to be publicized in the Bar News. I obtained valuable experience with The Florida Bar Board of Governors as the liaison to the board while I served as statewide president of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers (FAWL) from 1997 to 1998. Not only did I gain a thorough knowledge of the issues facing the board and the board’s procedures, I actively negotiated and built coalitions with other board members. As an advocate in the passage of Revision 9 to the Florida Constitution, I gained valuable experience on how to create effective policy and gather the support of multiple coalitions. Agenda Prevention of Tort Reform: Tort reform continues to be actively discussed in the Florida Legislature. The Florida Bar needs to take an aggressive stand to prevent the legislature from decreasing access to the courts and further weakening our jury system. Judicial Selection: Currently pending in the Florida House is a bill that would reconfigure judicial nominating commissions to allow more members appointed by the governor and leaders of the House and Senate, thereby diluting The Florida Bar’s participation in the selection process. I am committed to maintaining the current make-up of the JNCs. Public Image: The Florida Bar needs to take the initiative to improve the public image of lawyers, including publicizing the effectiveness of the Bar’s self-regulation, in order to defeat the continuing campaign of the Florida Legislature to have the Bar regulated by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Online CLE: The Florida Bar has increased online access to assist members more effectively; this trend needs to continue. I will actively pursue the creation of Internet-based CLE courses and the reporting of out-of-state CLE credits to the Bar over the Internet. David L. Deehl We must restore the bonds of trust between lawyers and clients. The Florida Bar should be our partner for professionalism to assist us in developing the skills, support and tools we need to be more effective. We need to publicize the inspiring good deeds lawyers do. A practicing trial lawyer since 1982, I’m Florida Bar Board Certified in Civil Trial and also in Business Litigation Law, and rated AV by Martindale-Hubbell. I know the concerns of lawyers. I have worked in larger firms, and started my own firm. I know the practical aspects of the practice of law. On the Professional Ethics Committee since 1994, I worked to make e-mailed Ethics Hot Line questions and answers available. In addition to the telephone hot line, staff attorneys can now respond efficiently by computer: try e-mailing to [email protected] with your ethics questions. Threats to the independence of the Bar and judiciary are real and must be addressed now, and that is why I am running for the board. Our courts and lawyers have been unfairly attacked. There are plans afoot to remove control of the Bar from the Supreme Court; multidisciplinary practices are growing and evading regulation; and the right to jury trial is being restricted. Our board needs courageous leadership to fight for us. The Bar must address core issues, promoting the independence of courts and lawyers. Merit selection and the elective process need improvement. Barriers to areas of practice for minorities must be removed. I believe I am qualified to serve on the Board of Governors through my past service as: • President of the Dade County Trial Lawyers Association. • Director and Executive Committee member of the Dade County Bar Association. • President of the South Florida Interprofessional Council. • Adjunct professor for over 10 years at the University of Miami School of Law. I earned a diploma in Teaching Advocacy Skills from the NITA Harvard Law School program and was awarded the Excellence in Education Award by Professional Education Systems, Inc., in 1998. I have lectured on trial skills, personal injury, civil procedure, insurance, commercial litigation, and ethics. I’ve lectured first-year medical students at the UM Medical School. I have coached the UM Law School and the Hialeah-Miami Lakes High School mock trial teams, and have often spoken at public schools on career days. As a special master, member of foster care review panels and as a guardian ad litem, I have served the courts and children in need. My community work has included pro bono cases and volunteer work with community organizations. For more information see my website www.deehl.com, or call me. I would be honored to receive your vote and promise to work hard for you. Valerie Tompkins If elected to the Board of Governors, I will do my best to serve all Bar members. I will seek input from you and do my utmost to satisfy all reasonable and prudent requests quickly and efficiently. I was admitted to the practice of law in both Florida and Georgia in 1985. Since my admission, I have practiced in small firms, my own firm and for the state of Florida. Currently, I am working as a staff attorney for the 11th Judicial Circuit in Miami. My staff position provides a unique opportunity for an attorney not advocating either side. This is a neutral position, where the facts are weighed and law applied without bias for or against the plaintiff or defendant. The last few years have provided me with a solid foundation for objective analysis of legal matters. Objectivity is a trait that will benefit the board, which has an ample supply of active advocates. Neutral individuals, such as myself, will round out the current board and provide an additional, much-needed perspective to its decision-making. As a working parent, I am sensitive to the needs and concerns of those of you who are similarly situated. Hard-working, professional attorneys should not be forced to choose between parenting and working. I will work toward making lawyering one of the top 10 professions for working parents. To further this goal, I will encourage development of job-sharing, telecommuting, part-time positions and on-site daycare. Working parents are a valuable resource which enhance our profession. We can be examples for our children by showing them how to balance time spent between home and work. Their future, as well as ours, hangs in the balance. In my 15 years of practice, I have not overlooked the small minority of lawyers who give our profession a bad name. We have all heard the lawyer jokes, and, unfortunately, most of us have been able to think of a lawyer or two for whom the jokes are appropriate. I will continue to work toward eliminating unprofessional lawyers through the various opportunities and means available to the board. The task of promoting professionalism is one we all share and should teach by example: by demonstrating our respect for the dignity and esteem of the law, the judicial system and the legal profession at all times. Please remember to vote in March. The deadline for receiving ballots is midnight, March 21, 2001. As demonstrated by the last presidential election, every vote counts! 13th Circuit, Seat 2 Richard B. Kay The world is full of educated derelicts; the unsuccessful genius is almost a proverb. The one thing that’s omnipotent is persistence. This is my seventh time as a candidate for the Board of Governors. Each time I have received about 27 percent of the vote. Four thousand seven hundred attorneys in the 15th Judicial Circuit, but only about 1,600 bother to vote. WHY? My conclusion is that so many solos and small law firms feel that it is a futile exercise; large law firms, government attorneys and other controlled organizations like the Legal Aid Society control the outcome by making sure their control is not placed in jeopardy. The leadership of the state Bar lost its direction by the many things they have done and not done. One example is they misjudged public reaction to their attempt to take complete control of the judicial system with the idea of so-called merit selection of all trial judges. In the 15th Judicial Circuit, their plan was soundly defeated by the voters. We do need changes in how we pick and retain judges, but taking away the right of the voters to elect their trial judges was the wrong solution. We must renew efforts to do away with per curiam affirmed decisions in the district courts of appeal. The recent tragedy in the state of Florida, during the recent election, has sent the public’s perception of attorneys and judges to the lowest level in my lifetime. We need attorneys to serve on the Board of Governors because they will back programs that will restore public confidence in both the Bar and the judicial system. Some ideas are as follows: 1. Find out why the public dislikes attorneys and the judicial system. Do this before we spend another $100,000 telling the public how great we are. 2. Encourage the solo practitioners to serve the public efficiently with real programs that will cut their costs and make it easier for them to deliver legal services to the public. 3. Have the county pay for court reporters to cover proceedings in court, at county expense, or have an electronic system in each court to record all proceedings. 4. We encourage attorneys to specialize; why shouldn’t the judges do the same? It is difficult for an attorney who specializes in criminal law to appear before a judge when the judge has just spent the last few years in the juvenile and civil divisions. Judges should serve in a division who are experts in that division’s law. 5. Each trial judge needs a judicial assistant to research law and assist the judge in the drafting of orders and judgments so we have more legal and just decisions. I would urge all attorneys in the 15th Judicial Circuit to contact me, if I am elected, and give me any and all ideas to make the Bar and judicial system better and help me build and restore confidence in the legal system. My qualifications include admission to the Ohio bar (1948), The Florida Bar (1977), the U.S. Supreme Court (1964), the Southern District U.S. District Court, and organizer and first president of the North Palm Beach County Bar Association. 16th Circuit, Seat 1 Board of Governors candidates present their views, qualifications Edward M. Joffe My Platform: Develop an Election Omnibus Worker Program. In some jurisdictions, attorneys and law students volunteer during elections to act as omnibus workers at polling places to assist in disputes and assure that the individual’s right to vote is protected. Such a program in Florida, along with updated county election procedures, would raise the caliber of the election process and help correct certain of the perceived and real problems with the recent election. Develop a Policy on the Multijurisdictional Practice of Law. Many out-of-state attorneys not admitted to our Bar represent their clients in Florida. Alan Dimond, a past president of The Florida Bar, is sitting on an ABA committee studying this issue. The ABA may take a position on this issue at its annual meeting this summer. It is important that our state Bar monitors these issues and be prepared to consider changes in policy to protect the public interest. Expand the Bar’s Technology Task Force. Presently, a Florida Bar-sponsored technology task force is compiling information on the use of technology to help Bar members better access Bar resources. The scope of this task force should be expanded. Many of the Bar’s members do not have access to the information or resources to enable them to take full advantage of the new technologies. This task force can also develop the technical expertise and develop the Bar’s purchasing power needed to ensure that Bar members will become educated about the latest technologies, and, also, giving them the access to acquire these technologies. Help Defend the Independence of the Judiciary. The recent controversy in the presidential election has caused certain groups to attack the traditional independence of the judiciary. The Bar should participate in educating the public on the importance of protecting the judiciary from political demagoguery and special interests. Likewise, the Bar should be prepared to take public positions against legislative encroachment on the judiciary’s independence. Professional EmploymentSandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A., Miami; head of Litigation Department. Commercial Litigation: concentrations International and Intellectual Property. American Arbitration Association Panel Member Commercial and International. Martindale Hubbell Rating: av. Admissions: Georgia (1974); Florida (1981); Board Certified: International Law. Bar Activities:Initial Chair International Law Certification Committee, Florida Bar (1998-2000). • Chair International Law Section, Florida Bar (1997-98). • Editor, International Law Quarterly (1991-1996). • Member Grievance Committee 11M (1998-present). Community Activities: Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce Europe-Pacific Rim Business Opportunities Committee Founder and Chair (1992-1998). • Bet Shira Synagogue Past Member of the Board of Directors. Education: University of Michigan, BBA with honors, 1970. New York University School of Law, J.D., 1974. Robert D. Peltz This is an important time for The Florida Bar and its members. In the upcoming year we will face many significant issues and challenges together, including: • Preserving our independent judiciary and Bar from attempts at regulation by the legislature and the continued encroachment of multidisciplinary practices. • Continuing to improve attorney professionalism, which will require the combined efforts of both lawyers and judges; • Improving the public’s perception of attorneys and continuing to regulate lawyer advertising consistent with permissible constitutional guidelines; • Promoting new technologies which improve the quality of legal practice, while at the same time recognizing their impact upon existing ethical and practice requirements; • Continuing to address ongoing issues, such as mandatory pro bono and CLE requirements and the use of Bar dues. During the 25 years I have been practicing in this legal community, I have been fortunate to represent a broad spectrum of clients in many different fields, including personal injury, maritime, commercial, banking and corporate litigation. As a result I have extensively represented both plaintiffs and defendants, individuals, small businesses, domestic corporations and international entities in both the trial and appellate courts. This wide range of experiences has provided me with additional insights into the different roles which The Florida Bar plays for the diverse segments that comprise it. These differing experiences also greatly help in providing different perspectives in analyzing the many issues which our legal community will face. Qualifications: Throughout my legal career, I have attempted to contribute to the development of our legal system and the public’s perception of it through active participation in various professional and Bar organizations, law school teaching, CLE lecturing, amicus curiae work, pro bono service, extensive legal writing, lobbying and community service. Some of the professional experiences which I have had in the past that will help provide a better understanding of many of the issues which will face the Board of Governors in the upcoming year include: • Dade County Trial Lawyers Association (president, president-elect, secretary, treasurer). • Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers (College of Diplomates, Amicus Curiae and other committees, CLE lecturer). • Florida Bar (chairman, Standing Committee on Advertising; Admiralty Committee; Advertising Task Force; Review Panel, Board of Legal Specialization, CLE lecturer). • American Board of Trial Advocates (charter member, Amicus Curiae Committee). • Maritime Law Association (proctor). • Southeastern Admiralty Law Institute (port director, Seminar Committee). • University of Miami Trial Advocacy Program (instructor). As an AV-rated and Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney, I have also served extensively in the trenches, which has provided the necessary practical experience to understand and appreciate the issues that attorneys face on a daily basis. Commitment: While the Bar must strive to promote the common interests of all of its members, its responsibilities extend beyond just lawyers. An independent and responsible Bar is absolutely essential to the proper operation of our legal system and its guarantees of equality, fundamental fairness and due process for all citizens. In order to properly serve all of these functions, both the Bar and its leadership must be constantly accessible and responsive to the concerns, thoughts and interests of all of its members. 11th Circuit, Seat 4 Board of Governors candidates present their views, qualifications Twenty-two Bar members are seeking eight seats in this year’s Board of Governors elections. Ballots are scheduled to be mailed February 26, and must be received by the Bar’s elections company no later than midnight, March 21. This is the first Bar election where members may vote online or cast a traditional paper ballot. See story, page 8. Below are the platform statements of the candidates. If a runoff is necessary in the races with more than two candidates, those ballots will be mailed March 30. Ninth Circuit, Seat 2 Russell W. Divine I believe that my background provides me with the experience needed to effectively represent you. I grew up in the Orlando area and have lived here for 43 years. In 1980, I graduated from the University of Florida Law School and began my practice in Orlando. Although I have worked in many commercial areas of the law, my practice is now concentrated in the area of real property. I have been Board Certified in Real Estate Law since 1990. I currently practice in the firm of Divine & Estes, P.A. During the last 20 years, I have been very active in Orange County Bar Association and other professional activities. I chaired the OCBA’s Continuing Education Committee for two years, served on the Executive Council from 1989 to 1994 and was OCBA’s president for 1994-1995. During my tenure as president, I played a major role in the creation of the Teen Court program and helped to begin the summer internship program. In addition to my OCBA activities, I have also served on and chaired a Florida Bar grievance committee and served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Legal Aid Society. During most of my legal career, I have had significant responsibilities for the management of the firms with which I practiced. Because of that, I believe I have gained valuable insight into the economics of practicing law and the mounting pressures we all face from advancing technology, increased competition and clients who demand that we keep pace and maximize efficiency (i.e., keep fees down). I believe that our profession, and therefore The Florida Bar, faces several significant issues in the coming years: Competition: These days, competition comes not only from other lawyers, but also from a variety of other industries seeking to invade what has traditionally been the domain of lawyers. The Florida Bar must continue to study this trend. Lawyers must be able to compete effectively in today’s marketplace and the Bar should aggressively assist its members in that regard. The Florida Bar should continue to analyze the possibility of alliances with other businesses and look for ways for lawyers to leverage their position as providers of traditional legal services. Obviously, this must be done without compromising ethical standards, but those standards must be evaluated and applied in the context of today’s legal services environment. Technology: Rapid changes in technology continue to challenge our profession. While new technology has helped us practice law more efficiently, it has also created new demands and pressures in the delivery of our services. The Florida Bar should continue to assist us in meeting those challenges by continuing to provide information and assistance on the latest law office technology and software. Professionalism and Diversity: The rapid growth of our profession makes it more difficult to develop any sense of collegiality or community among lawyers. E-mail and other electronic media also limit personal contact and meaningful interaction between lawyers. The Bar should continue to be proactive in the area of professionalism and the training of young lawyers in order to maintain a high level of mutual respect and civility among lawyers. This will also be important in the area of diversity. Our Bar has made great strides in this area, but still has a long way to go. It is important to bring more minority members into active participation in the Bar, not only by increasing opportunities for involvement, but also by providing training and mentoring programs for young lawyers. As the Bar grows and personal interaction decreases, these efforts will become even more important. We cannot allow ourselves to become fragmented into numerous disenfranchised groups. The Bar must strive to be inclusive and to represent the interests of all its members. That is the only way The Florida Bar can be an effective advocate for our interests. It is a privilege to practice in the Ninth Circuit and I would very much like to represent you on the Board of Governors. Silvia S. Ibanez You will understandably want to know what motivates my candidacy for Ninth Circuit, Seat 2, Florida Bar Board of Governors. I love my profession but it was not my first one. My background consists of 26 years of business and tax transactional practice, some of these in the CPA and CFP worlds. As an attorney, I have practiced in state and federal court, briefly and successfully. Moreover, I had a brief appellate stint, due to my stand on truthful use of my professional credentials, before the U.S. Supreme Court, which I was privileged to argue and win. Ibanez v. State of Florida, Dept of Prof. Reg., Bd. Of Acct., 512 U.S. 136 (1994). You may not know that The Florida Bar filed an amicus brief in support of my lawyer advertising possibly the first time that The Florida Bar has supported an attorney’s advertising on First Amendment grounds. The case also dealt with regulatory and ethical concerns and has shaped my life. Future of the Legal Profession: I strongly believe in maintaining the integrity and independence of the legal profession, but I do not hide my head in the sand to blind myself from the windstorm that is brewing. Some would say the storm consists of the MDP advocates and all we have to do is say “NO” to them. I disagree because consumers of services are easily convinced in these highly complex times that “simple is better.” As you know the large CPA firms are proposing one-stop shopping for professional services. Many of the services attorneys offer can be rendered by nonlawyers, as I was recently reminded by a Tallahassee attorney who practices in the administrative arena. Suggestion: Let us work together to redefine what constitutes the practice of law and how to best preserve our legal profession for the benefit of society. Let us be proactive not reactive. Bar Dues Prioritization and Accountability: Due to my strong fiscal background, one of my responsibilities as your circuit representative would be to ensure that the Bar’s budget reflects the will of its members. Consequently, this requires setting priorities and employing our membership fees wisely. One of my priorities is educating the public about Florida’s legal profession. I don’t know of any one industry or profession in Florida which performs more pro bono and public service than attorneys. Why not spend part of our fees to enlighten them? This is not a strictly self-serving idea. Whenever we face the public to speak on any issue of importance, the reputation and integrity of the speaker and his profession are as important as the message itself. Suggestion: Let us work to restore the dignity that our profession deserves. Alfreda D. Coward Are you ready for a candidate who has a proven track record for getting the job done? Are you ready for a candidate who is committed to your future, your issues, your concerns…committed to you? Are you ready for a candidate who has the power, perseverance, patience and proficiency to affect change? Are you ready for a candidate who exemplifies leadership, sincerity, devotion, experience, hard work, awareness and fortitude? Then you are ready for Alfreda D. Coward, Esquire. Allow me to steer you into the millennium where the focus is on “change”. As a strong and active member of The Florida Bar, I look forward to serving my fellow colleagues as a member of The Florida Bar Board of Governors. I have upheld the ideals, commitment and oath of The Florida Bar and will continue to do so. Throughout my years as a dedicated bar member, I have wrestled with the concerns of colleagues and the public ranging from continuing legal education courses, unauthorized practice of law, pro bono services, Bar admissions, proposed increase in Bar dues, attorney “help” programs, mentor/mentee programs within The Florida Bar and improving the public perception of the profession. We need stronger support for both our beginning attorneys as well as seasoned attorneys. I plan to initiate more volunteer programs, including, but not limited to, seminars which demonstrate the legal profession is motivated by equal justice and equal access. I am confident I have the passion, knowledge, skills and motivation to serve the public and my fellow colleagues. My experience in working with different organizations and The Florida Bar, coupled with my commitment to service, give me an edge to addressing and handling the concerns of vast groups. I look forward to meeting the needs of my colleagues. I look forward to your input and suggestions. Above all, I look forward to being your voice as a member of The Florida Bar Board of Governors. James B. Davis It is both an honor and a duty to be of service to The Florida Bar, the Broward County and other voluntary bar associations with whom I have been associated for the last 25 years. In those years, I have learned that part of being a lawyer is the obligation to give back to society. I have been fortunate throughout my professional career to have received guidance and training from some of this state’s finest lawyers. They have taught me the importance of integrity, education and adaptability. My service to the Bar is but the fulfillment of my obligation to ensure these goals are achieved. A fundamental purpose in representing Broward County on the Board of Governors is to continue my service to the Bar, which began in 1977 when I was elected as a representative on the Board of Governors of the Young Lawyers Section (now Division) from Broward County. Since that time I have also served as president of the Broward County Young Lawyers Section. I became a Board Certified Tax Lawyer in 1983 and later served a three-year term on the Tax Certification Committee. The millennium marks my fifth year as a member of the Board of Legal Specialization and Education and my second term as statewide director of Educational Programs for the Tax Section of The Florida Bar. Dedication to the promotion of lawyer excellence and academics is a driving force that has motivated my candidacy for the Board of Governors. My 25 years of service to the Bar have given me the unique opportunity to actually participate in enhancing lawyer excellence as well as the opportunity to have met and served with Florida attorneys of all practice areas. This experience and the exchange of ideas, concerns and thoughts about long term objectives has broadened my perspective of the varied demands of the practice of law throughout the state. The practice of law has changed over the last 25 years, and it will continue to do so. And it is our response to change that will be the ultimate measure of our excellence as lawyers. I believe that our profession has made great advances in improving the quality of legal services offered to the public; however, if we as practicing lawyers fail to adapt to prospective changes which affect each area of legal practice in different ways, these advances may be lost and ultimately we may find ourselves relegated to managed practices like our physician counterparts or, worse yet, regulation by other than an integrated Bar. We need to address these concerns with one voice while continuing to increase our profession’s quality of practice and public image. My objectives in serving as a representative from the 17th Judicial Circuit on the Board of Governors are simply to further those goals. Jerome Ira Solkoff A candidate for the Board of Governors must have a reputation for honesty, integrity and ethical conduct, be aware of the major challenges facing the Bar, exhibit a willingness to make decisions for the long range and not merely react to events, and offer genuine advocacy for law firms and individual practitioners. I believe that I meet those criteria. I am an active member of The Florida Bar’s Council of Sections, the Elder Law Section (a founder and past chair), the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, the American Bar Association and the Broward County Bar Association. My two-volume book, “Florida Elder Law,” published by West Group, has been the principal desk reference for attorneys in that field for the past six years. I am certified in Elder Law by The Florida Bar and the national Elder Law Foundation. I have also been elected a member of Scribes, the American Society of Writers on Legal Subjects. We face critical issues to protect the rule of law and enhance our profession. The Bar must take a proactive position to do so. I would like to be a part of that process and would appreciate your vote. Frank C. Walker I am honored to be a candidate for the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar from the 17th Circuit, Seat 5. My goal will be to represent the interests of all attorneys in Broward County and to promote professionalism in our profession. My diverse background while practicing law and involvement in Bar work provides me with the experience and knowledge necessary to effectively represent the attorneys of Broward County. I have practiced law as a sole practitioner or in a small firm in Broward County for 30 years. I have been involved in every aspect of the practice of law and pride myself on the fact that I can draw a will, handle a real estate closing or try a case. I understand the practice of law, the challenges facing the practice and today’s challenges from a transactional attorney’s standpoint and a trial attorney’s standpoint. I describe my practice as a “people’s practice” and therefore, I understand the needs and desires of attorneys and the obligation to and expectations of clients. I have been active in Bar activities during my entire legal career. As to the Broward County Bar, for the last seven years I have served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Broward County Bar Association and currently serve as its president. I have also served as chairman of the Judicial Tenure and Selection Committee, the Trial Lawyers Section, the Bench and Bar Committee and president of the Broward County Trial Lawyers Association. I have served on several Florida Bar committees, including the 17th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission, a special committee on court costs and delays and presently as a member of the Code and Rules of Evidence Committee. I have also been very active in the legislative program of the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers and understand completely the threat to the independence of the judiciary and the separation of powers. As we move into the year 2001, there are many changes that attorneys will face which will have a significant impact on our practice. These issues include, but certainly are not limited to, the independence of the judiciary and the Bar, the unauthorized practice of law and preserving our core professional duties of independence, loyalty and confidentiality. It is important to have effective members on the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar with the necessary understanding of these and all issues facing the Bar. In the past, I have found time in my practice to dedicate service to the attorneys of Broward County and I pledge to continue to do so in the future. I will work honestly, diligently and enthusiastically on your behalf. Call me concerning my qualifications or positions at (954) 764-7677 or e-mail me at [email protected] I would greatly appreciate your vote. 19th Circuit, Seat 1 Gean Cary Junginger For the 16 years that I have been practicing law, I have seen a rise in professionalism among lawyers, but a decrease in their ability to make a living and in their treatment by the courts and the public. I feel that The Florida Bar has not done enough to improve the lives of the individual lawyers. I think that The Florida Bar has failed the individual lawyers and in many circumstances either acquiesced to or even contributed to the erosion of general perceptions of the profession. I feel that we can correct this. This is why I need your vote, so I may represent you on the Board of Governors. I oppose: 1) any increase in Bar dues; 2) the Bar taking on political causes and campaigning for them with Bar monies (i.e. the election of judges); 3) the Bar transfer of CLE publications to book companies when it would be cheaper to electronically publish them. We need closer scrutiny as to where the Bar is spending its money. With the increase in information technology, it should be cheaper and not more expensive to manage the business of the Bar. There is no conflict in being a good lawyer and a good businessman, and the public should not be encouraged to think otherwise. While people are being encouraged to represent themselves, the Bar should suggest the benefits of having a lawyer. If the Bar is going to become involved in legislation, it should be to protect the profession and make it easier for lawyers to make a living. If we are to put our client’s interests ahead of our own, the Bar should put our interests first. The Florida Bar should be more like a union. Most of us became a lawyer to help people, and that is what we do. Outside of our practices, we volunteer our time in our churches, synagogues and mosques; we work in public service organizations; we do charity work; we set examples for youth and we make a difference. We are the most highly educated people in our communities. We do not deserve the bad reputation and stigma that has been inflicted upon us. We deserve respect, recognition and appropriate compensation for our efforts and the Bar should promote this. I am a sole practitioner in Ft. Pierce. I am a certified mediator in Family and Dependency law and a civil arbitrator. I have served on numerous Bar committees over the past few years and currently serve on the Family Law Rules Committee. I am a member of the St. Lucie County Bar Association and the Catholic Lawyers Guild. I feel as lawyers we do not abandon our faith to go to work and if we integrate our faith into our practices, we will be better lawyers. I would appreciate your vote. For further information or if you have questions, I am building a web page at http://www.geocities.com/geanjunginger/index.html. Louis B. (Buck) Vocelle, Jr. I am very pleased to have represented the lawyers of the 19th Judicial Circuit as their representative on The Florida Bar Board of Governors. This year I have drawn opposition. Over the past 18 years, I have had substantial involvement in trying cases in all four counties in our circuit Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin and Okeechobee. I am extremely proud of our profession as lawyers and have attempted to use my experience to best represent and voice the views of lawyers on the Treasure Coast. I have been fortunate to serve in many Bar positions, including chair of the Professional Ethics Committee of The Florida Bar and chair of the Judicial Nominating Commission for the 19th Circuit, before being elected to the Board of Governors. As both a board certified civil trial lawyer and board certified business litigation lawyer, my trial practice has enabled me to meet and try cases with nearly all of our circuit and county judges. I have also been fortunate to have interacted with many lawyers from Vero Beach south to Stuart and west to Okeechobee. Not only have I learned from lawyers and judges in this circuit, but I have also had the opportunity to interact with a great many people and businesses in all four counties. I have attempted to use the knowledge that I have gained from speaking with you, the lawyers, to best represent your views before the Board of Governors. I don’t have a specific platform, other than to promise you that I will continue to use my best efforts and abilities to make sure that your views are heard. We in the 19th Judicial Circuit are faced with issues which affect our many solo practitioners and small firms that are far different from those issues facing large firms in metropolitan areas. I believe that my practice has enabled me to not only hear your views on these issues, but to present them to the board, along with other board members representing similar-size counties with similar problems. Many of you may not realize that service on the Board of Governors, including travel expenses, are not reimbursed by the Bar in any way, shape or form. I will continue to devote approximately four to five days every two months in preparing for and attending board meetings in my effort to make sure that your voices and views are heard. I can think of no honor greater than that which you have given me to continue to serve you as your representative. I would be proud to continue to represent all of you on the Board of Governors and would ask that you re-elect me to another term.last_img read more