Students reject move to end the wearing of scholars’ gowns

first_imgStudents have overwhelming voted against a motion on whether OUSU should oppose the wearing of scholars’ gowns in examinations.In a consultation poll, 2126 students voted against the motion that OUSU should oppose the wearing of differential gowns in examinations, with 1214 in favour, and 33 abstentions. The poll was open for two days and received a total turnout of 3373—around 14 per cent of the student body.The results of the poll, which is non-binding, will be discussed and voted on in OUSU’s 1st week Michaelmas Council.The motion was proposed by Wadham students, Matilda Agace and Isobel Cockbur. Writing in Cherwell, Agace, Cockbur and Taisie Tsikas claimed that “the hierarchical gown structure is fundamentally in conflict with ideals of community and equality that the University espouses”. “Many students are made to feel uncomfortable and nervous by the presence of a visual reminder of what they might perceive as their academic inferiority,” they wrote.It was further suggested that scholars’ gowns, which cost £45, do not accurately represent academic achievement. An argument in favour of the motion on OUSU’s website argued: “prelims results are more of a reflection of a student’s educational background than their grade in Finals”.However, there has been strong opposition to the banning of scholars gowns. Writing in Cherwell, Thomas Munro said that it would be “perverse to deny those who have achieved academically the rewards of their success”.Munro further argued: “to remove the right to wear [scholars’ gowns] from those who have already achieved scholarships reeks of envy, rather than any real desire for reform”.It remains unclear if the poll will prove decisive on this contentious issue. Because the consultation was solely advisory, OUSU council could still technically vote to adopt the policy of opposing differential gowns in examinations in October.last_img read more

Gore Verbinski explains why Bioshock movie never got off the ground

first_imgIt’s been over three years since we first heard that Gore Verbinski of Pirates of the Caribbean fame was planning on adapting Irrational Games’ 2007 dystopian classic Bioshock to the silver screen. Unfortunately, since that announcement, the Bioshock movie has become yet another example of a video game property undergoing Hollywood development hell. The last we heard of the project was six months ago, with Verbinski stepping down into a producer role and 28 Weeks Later director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo stepping up to direct. Half a year later, an Bioshock is no closer to production… and now Verbinski is talking about the difficulties he’s had bringing it to the screen, and strongly implying that the whole project has been canceled.“I couldn’t really get past anybody that would spend the money that it would take to do it and keep an R rating,” he explained to Coming Soon. “Alternately, I wasn’t really interested in pursuing a PG-13 version. Because the R rating is inherent. Little Sisters and injections and the whole thing. I just wanted to really, really make it a movie where, four days later, you’re still shivering and going, “Jesus Christ!”… It’s a movie that has to be really, really scary, but you also have to create a whole underwater world, so the pricetag is high. We just didn’t have any takers on an R-rated movie with that pricetag.”For haters of Hollywood’s sudden obsession with 3D, though, maybe that’s a good thing, because Verbiniski pictured the film as a 3D spectacle.“[Bioshock] would be a great movie to do in 3D. I’d like to go into that world wearing a pair of glasses. I think in general, gaming is perfect for 3D. Anything where you’re the protagonist. The kid in ‘The Shining’ on the big wheel, going around corridors. That’s what 3D is perfect for. To make people feel on-edge.”In other words, Verbinski wanted a lot of splicers jumping out of the screen. Maybe it’s best if Bioshock remains a video game property after all?Read more at Coming Soonlast_img read more