Candidates for overseer and elected director announced

first_imgThis spring, alumni can vote for a new group of Harvard Overseers and Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) elected directors. The official candidates’ names appear in ballot order below, as determined by lot.Ballots will be mailed no later than April 1 and must be received in Cambridge by noon on May 20 to be counted. Results of the election will be announced at the HAA’s annual meeting on the afternoon of Commencement on May 26. All holders of Harvard degrees, except Corporation members and officers of instruction and government at Harvard, are entitled to vote for Overseer candidates. The election for HAA directors is open to all Harvard degree holders.The HAA’s nominating committee has proposed the following candidates in 2016:For OverseerKent Walker ’83 magna cum laudeSenior vice president and general counsel, Google Inc.Palo Alto, Calif.Ketanji Brown Jackson ’92 magna cum laude, J.D. ’96 cum laudeJudge, United States District Court for the District of ColumbiaWashington, D.C.Helena Buonanno Foulkes ’86 magna cum laude, M.B.A. ’92President, CVS/pharmacy; executive vice president, CVS HealthProvidence, R.I.John J. Moon ’89 magna cum laude, A.M. ’93, Ph.D. ’94Managing director, Morgan StanleyNew York, N.Y.Alejandro Ramírez Magaña ’94 cum laude, M.B.A. ’01Chief executive officer, CinépolisMexico City, MexicoDamian Woetzel, M.P.A. ’07Artistic director, Vail International Dance Festival; director, Aspen Institute Arts Program, DEMO at the Kennedy Center, and Independent ProjectsRoxbury, Conn.Karen Falkenstein Green ’78 magna cum laude, J.D. ’81 cum laudeSenior partner, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, LLPBostonLindsay Chase-Lansdale ’74 magna cum laudeAssociate provost for faculty and Frances Willard Professor of Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern UniversityEvanston, Ill.Candidates for Overseer were nominated by petition:Ralph Nader, LL.B. ’58Citizen-activist and author; founder, The Center for Responsive Law and Public CitizenWashington, D.C.Stephen HsuProfessor of theoretical physics and vice president for research and graduate studies, Michigan State UniversityOkemos, Mich.Ron Unz ’83 magna cum laudeSoftware developer and chairman, UNZ.org; Publisher, The Unz ReviewPalo Alto, Calif.Stuart Taylor Jr., J.D. ’77 magna cum laudeAuthor, journalist, lawyer; nonresident senior fellow, Brookings InstitutionWashington, D.C.Lee C. Cheng ’93 magna cum laudeChief legal officer, Newegg, Inc.Santa Ana, Calif.Candidates nominated by the HAA for Elected Director:David Battat ’91 magna cum laudePresident and chief executive officer, Atrion Corp.New York, N.Y.Farai N. Chideya ’90 magna cum laudeDistinguished Writer in Residence, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York UniversityNew York, N.Y.Rye Barcott, M.B.A./M.PA. ’09Managing partner and co-founder, Double Time CapitalCharlotte, N.C.Susan M. Cheng, M.P.P. ’04, Ed.L.D. ’13Senior associate dean for Diversity and Inclusion, Georgetown University School of MedicineWashington, D.C.Victor Jih, J.D. ’96Litigation Partner, Irell & Manella LLPLos AngelesEliana Murillo ’10Head of Multicultural Marketing, Google Inc.San Francisco, CATrey Grayson ’94 cum laudePresident and CEO, Northern Kentucky Chamber of CommerceFort Mitchell, Ky.Janet Nezhad Band ’83 magna cum laude, M.B.A. ’89, J.D. ’90 cum laudeDevelopment consultant to nonprofit organizationsNew York, N.Y.Michael C. Payne ’77 cum laude, M.D. ’81, M.P.H. ’82Attending physician, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Cambridge Health AllianceCambridge, Mass.last_img read more

News from MesosCon: libStorage Delivers Native Storage to Container Platforms

first_imgBreaking from MesosCon: EMC announces pioneering open source initiative—libStorage. Promoting storage to a first-class citizen, libStorage provides a platform-agnostic framework that enables storage provisioning, orchestration and control across a rapidly changing open source and container-driven ecosystem.Containers are hot and getting hotter—but they’re not without their challenges. Container and open source platforms are each addressing storage challenges independently and building a healthy ecosystem around storage is critical. As a result, sustainability is in question as additional methods of bringing storage into these platforms emerge. EMC has introduced libStorage to move the needle.So why libStorage and why now?To enable the highest level of choice for users, platforms have the opportunity to embrace an open and comprehensive storage orchestration framework. This drives the maturity of the ecosystem forward where customers have a reliable and supportable standardized method to get storage to containers and applications, while reducing the number of moving parts.Today, capabilities and strengths differ in the container ecosystem—so users may have any combination of Cloud Foundry, Docker, Mesos and Kubernetes in their environments and expect to run different types of applications in each platform. libStorage defines a common framework and storage model to deliver resources to containers and consumers of containers—and ultimately, one common level of functionality to be exposed and supported through all container platforms.So what does all this mean? EMC is making storage a first-class citizen by creating an ideal architecture that embeds libStorage client and server components to enable container runtimes to communicate directly with storage platforms. This design requires minimal operational dependencies and provides volume management for container runtimes, simplifying and automating a once complex and time-consuming task. This new architecture will allow every storage vendor to immediately become relevant in the container world. Pursuing the completely native libStorage route where the plumbing between container and storage platforms is invisible is possible by adopting libStorage in the control plane of storage platforms.But don’t just take our word for it. Rancher Labs has the scoop on libStorage, and CEO and Co-Founder Sheng Liang had this to say: “As with any new technology, containers create new challenges for users even as they solve existing ones. libStorage solves one of the most critical issues of containers in the context of storage: communication—knocking down a major hurdle for users and enabling them to more efficiently extract more value, more quickly, from multiple container platforms.”Furthering EMC’s commitment to open source, libStorage is the latest in a series of open source innovations led by EMC’s Community Onramp for Developer Enablement, known as EMC {code}. EMC {code} was founded in 2014 with the mission to support 3rd Platform development and open source communities through contributions to critical open source projects, engagement and technical solution leadership. The team is dedicated to assuring continued relevance and affinity for EMC’s software and physical infrastructure products.EMC {code} is showcasing libStorage at MesosCon, booth # P1 – stop by and check it out. libStorage is available on GitHub: https://github.com/emccode/libstoragelast_img read more

For doctors who think Trump fumbled the pandemic, the tight election is seen as an insult

first_img– Advertisement – In the spring, U.S. medical workers were heralded as heroes. But by the fall, the rhetoric had started to shift, with the public growing increasingly fatigued by the coronavirus pandemic and President Donald Trump accusing doctors of inflating Covid-19 death counts for money.With the death toll from the coronavirus continuing to tick up, many medical workers say they hoped for a landslide victory for Biden, who has said he’ll follow the advice of scientists if he’s wins the presidency.- Advertisement – Texas and Florida — where there have been more than 960,000 and 827,000 confirmed cases, respectively, so far — solidly went for Trump even though Democrats thought the outbreak gave them a fighting chance in some red states.“Many of us are now questioning whether we’re speaking into an echo chamber,” said Miami-based physician Dr. Krishna Komanduri. Miami-Dade County dealt a big blow to the Biden campaign in Florida and helped seal the state for Trump.The economy, and not the pandemic, was more of a priority for 70% of Trump voters, according to the NBC poll.- Advertisement – “Trump has insulted our integrity and allowed for more than seven months of chaos and excessive deaths to Covid,” said Dr. John Purakal, an emergency medicine physician based in North Carolina. “It’s so surprising to me,” he said. “But here we are.”A variety of polls indicate that the majority of Americans don’t approve of the administration’s management of the coronavirus. In July, just 32% of Americans said they approved of Trump’s pandemic strategy, according to The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. In August, 7 out of 10 Americans who responded to a CNN poll said the president’s response was embarrassing. NBC exits polls from Election Day and early voting, found that 51% of voters think U.S. efforts to contain the outbreak are going badly.Biden may still eke out a victory. But after the Trump administration undermined or contradicted its own medical experts on everything from wearing masks to reopening schools at the beginning of the outbreak, the tight race feels like a slap in the face for many physicians fighting the pandemic .- Advertisement – For doctors like Komanduri, the economy and the coronavirus are not separate issues. Successfully containing the virus will lead to fewer restrictions, which inevitably opens up the economy, he said.“It’s making me do a serious re-analysis of how I can make a difference,” added Komanduri, who’s the chief of transplantation and cellular therapy at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. “I went to bed Tuesday night feeling a real sense of helplessness and sadness.”Of course, not all health-care workers lean left and many remain major supporters of the Trump administration. A 2016 study found that 46% of doctors are Republicans. Things appear to have shifted in the past four years, however, with recent analyses indicating that more and more doctors are increasingly aligning themselves with the Democrats.For those who firmly sided with Democrats this year, the race has been too close for comfort. And that feels like a slight.As Purakal points out, hundreds of health-care workers have died from Covid-19, and countless others have been infected.“I really thought that our experiences in the trenches would impact people’s voting decisions,” added Dr. Avital O’Glasser, an associate professor and hospitalist at Oregon Health & Science University.Trump’s response to the virus reflects a disregard for scientific expertise, including his downplaying of the importance of masks. She thought Biden would win in a landslide, so the tight race is a real wake-up call, she said. Even if Biden ultimately wins, she’s been thinking about what she could do to communicate more effectively to people in the future.“Our country doesn’t have the science and math education that a lot of other countries have,” she said.Others say they are feeling exhausted after months fighting the coronavirus, and they were hoping for a clear-cut Biden victory to buoy their spirits.“I can’t help but feeling as a health-care worker that the nation really let us down … even if Biden does win,” added James Kerridge, a director of nursing practice based in Chicago. “All of the clapping doesn’t make up for the feeling of still being canon fodder for an inept administration.”Dr. George Alba, a pulmonologist based in the Boston area, said the election leaves him feeling dismayed. He’s had to live separately from his family for weeks at a time to keep them safe, and he’s been working long hours treating Covid-19 patients.“We felt like we had the nation’s support until the coronavirus became political and the administration started eroding confidence in scientists,” he said. “The sentiment around supporting health-care workers only lasted as long as it was politically convenient.”Others doctors have been doing a lot of soul-searching about what their patients might be going through, and how they can better relate to them.Dr. Laolu Fayanju, a family medicine doctor based in Ohio, treats patients in so-called Rust Belt cities like Youngstown.He’s heard from a lot of his patients that they’ve been having a difficult time during the pandemic and are feeling lonely and isolated. Others are concerned about their job prospects, and felt emboldened by Trump’s promises to bring back manufacturing jobs.He’s recognizing that many of those patients handed Trump a win in Ohio.“I drive through this former General Motors auto plant on my way to work,” he said. “It feels like a mausoleum, a symbolic representation of what the region is going through.”last_img read more