New pension research centre in Denmark secures DKK12.5m in funding

first_img“We will work to develop a minor in pensions for our many master students in finance and/or economics at CBS,” he said.These courses – and perhaps the minor – will also be available for masters students at other universities, Sørensen said.Funding has been pledged by the pensions sector to the tune of DKK2m per year for the first five years, and CBS will top this up with an extra 25%, or DKK500,000 a year, for five years.The centre aims to put on a “flagship” conference once a year, as well as workshops and possibly other activities to bridge ideas, knowledge and learning between practitioners and academics interested in pension issues, Sørensen said.The first flagship event will be held in June, focusing on the pension sector investing in a low interest-rate environment.Right now, this is one of the two main challenges Sørensen sees facing the Danish pensions industry, the other being the increasing number of people becoming pensioners who will need to sustain their level of living based on pension savings.The centre already has a number of research projects in progress, including one on forecasting stock returns for long-term investors, one on the implications of credit constraints on retirement saving decisions and another on the macroeconomic effects of longevity adjustment of the retirement age and pension benefits.The three directors – all professors at CBS – are Sørensen, Svend Erik Hougaard Jensen from the department of economics and Jesper Rangvid from the department of finance.“Other academics involved in the centre are mostly other researchers from the department of economics and the department of finance at CBS,” Sørensen said.“But there will also be a few academics from other universities – both in Denmark and outside Denmark – involved.”Besides Lærernes Pension and PensionDanmark, the centre’s list of sponsors from the industry includes ATP, Danica Pension, Industriens Pension, Nykredit Livsforsikring, Topdanmark, SEB Pensionsforsikring and Skandia Livsforsikring.Though the centre will work closely with the pension sector, including people working at pension funds and providers on its advisory board, Hougaard Jensen stressed it would maintain academic objectivity.“The cooperation with the pension sector is an essential part of PeRCent,” he said. “It provides us with a direct dialogue so we can coordinate our work with the sector continuously.“But, of course, we are not in the sector’s pocket, and the research we do is independent.”Torben Andersen, professor at Aarhus University – who is currently chairman of the Pension Commission in Denmark – will chair PeRCent’s advisory board.Other members of the advisory board are Peter Løchte Jørgensen, also a professor at Aarhus University; Susan Christoffersen, professor at the University of Toronto; Möger Pedersen; Brüniche-Olsen; Per Bremer Rasmussen, chief executive of industry association Forsikring & Pension; Danica’s chief executive Per Klitgaard; ATP chief executive Carsten Stendevad; and Laila Mortensen, chief executive of Industriens Pension. A new research centre on pensions has begun work in Copenhagen with DKK12.5m (€1.7m) in funding over the next five years, with the aim of increasing knowledge of the subject through research and helping develop the industry sector in Denmark.The Pension Research Centre (PeRCent) started up in January at Copenhagen Business School (CBS), having secured funding from the industry, as well as the business school itself.CBS professor Carsten Sørensen, one of the centre’s three leaders, told IPE: “We hope to provide excellent research output in the period so that the centre may continue receiving external funding from the pension sector in Denmark also, in continuation of this five-year period.”As well as producing this research, the centre will develop pension courses for CBS students.last_img read more

An Amazing Year for Lesser Sports

first_img2018 REVIEW…2018 REVIEW…2018 REVIEW…Two standout events of 2018 were the World Cup in Russia and the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia. The Super Eagles that represented Nigeria at the global football showpiece was the youngest of all the 32 teams. As the result of the experimentation of Franco-German tactician, Gernot Rohr, in his first two years in charge, nobody expected any miracle from happening at the Mundial. In this first part of the review of sports in Nigeria in 2018, DURO IKHAZUAGBE takes a look at the so-called lesser sports given little attention yet produce the best results when it matter most. In barely hour from now, the year 2018 would have become history. The journey of 365 days would have come to a full stop. As a FIFA World Cup year, Super Eagles performance at the Mundial in Russia appears to be the benchmark for gauging the success or otherwise of the sports sector in the country. The reason is because: Nigerians eat, drink and do everything that concerns the Beautiful Game with utmost passion. Whether such a decision is fair to the women’s game where the Super Falcons have bestrode the African Women’s Nations Cup like birthright with little accolade and attention from all that matter in the country’s sports, is a matter for another day‘Lesser sports’ like Table Tennis, Basketball, Wrestling and Badminton who exceeded what football brought to Nigeria in the year under review, have continued to remain in the background despite Aruna Quadri and colleagues winning silver in the team event of the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia and Aruna in particular also went as far as the quarter final stage at the ITTF World Championship. In basketball, D’Tigress won the AfroBasket as well as bagged ticket to the 2019 World Cup. Their male counterparts, D’Tigers as defending champions went all the way to the final of the Men’s AfroBasket but lost and still qualified for the World Cup. Odunayo Adekuoroye won gold in freestyle wrestling at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast 2018. It was an addition to the gold she claimed at the 2014 Games in India as well as the World Championship bronze medal of 2016.2018 was also a very good year for badminton, a hitherto lesser sport totally ignored and left to rot like most other racket games. But Francis Orbih who took over the mantle of leadership at the BFN, has turned around the fortunes of the sport. It has continued its steady climb to the top in the continent. Through personal efforts like what Daniel Igali is doing for wrestling, Orbih has shown to the rest of Africa that Nigerian badminton players are podium stuff. From one competition to the other around Africa, Dorcas Adesokan and Aanu Opeyori have become the most feared  players in Team Nigeria. Yet, this is the same sport players have been begging for funds from the Federal Ministry of Sports to attend events before Orbih took charge.The story of Nigeria’s maiden outing at the Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, North Korea reads like a fairytale. Team Nigeria’s Bobsled and Skeleton team, The ‘Ice Blazers’ made up of the quartet of Seun Adigun, Akuoma Omeiga, Simi Adeagbo and Ngozi Onwumere created a new identify for Nigeria. Of course as novices in the sport who had less than few weeks preparation with no known coach of the sport as guide, they finished 19th out of the 20 teams in the event. They were celebrated for breaking new grounds in sports for Nigeria. For Adigun in particular, transiting from being a hurdler to Bobsled was simply an adventure.If Super Eagles could not go beyond the Group Stage at Russia 2018, celebrating those who were considered infinitesimal in reckoning but turned out the ‘head corner stone’ is definitely not out of place.Nigeria’s Special Sports athletes, like always have remained the bedrock of the country’s sports. In 2018 like in the previous years, they turned their disability to ability. The Para weightlifters took away the gloom that enveloped the country’s contingent when after several days of competition, there was no gold medal recorded yet for Nigeria at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Roland Ezuruike and Paul Kehinde won gold and silver in the men’s event while women’s heavyweight champions Ndidi Nwosu and Esther Onyema harvested gold in that category. Lucy Ejike narrowly lost the gold of that same class to settle for a precious silver. The medals they won contributed immensely in helping Team Nigeria to a decent finish on the final medals’ table of the 2018 Commonwealth Games.Four years ago Team Nigeria dominated the track and field events at Glasgow 2014 Games with Blessing Ighoteguonor Okagbare the star athlete winning the sprint double in the 100 and 200m. She left the long jump gold for her fellow Delta athlete, Ese Brume to smile away with. But this year, with an inconsistent season caused by recurring injuries, Okagbare was in Gold Coast for just the 4x100m relay event so as not to aggravate the healing process she was going through. But Oluwatobiloba Amusan ensured that Team Nigeria had a track and field gold to celebrate. She gave signal of what to expect at the Games when she dusted reigning World Champion Sally Pearson in the semi final of the World Indoor Championships. She shocked Jamaica’s 2015 World Championship winner, Danielle Williams to win the 100m hurdles gold in her season’s best time of 12.68sec. It was just three seconds short of the Games record of 12.65.After years in the doldrums, Handball found a new energy in Sam Ocheho. He disbanded the senior national team and introduced  the Prudent Energy Handball League. To ensure steady inflow of talents to the senior cadre, he introduced the Under-12 and Under-15 championship. In his words: “From what we have seen in the national team we need to start using younger players, we need to go back and start using fresh legs.“This game is very physical and if we need to regain the top stop in Africa, we must go back to the youths.”He did the self-reassessment of the Nigerian situation after the not to convincing performance at the continental championship in Gabon. Today, handball is creeping back into the consciousness of Nigerians.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Syracuse hosts Notre Dame in pivotal conference matchup, still looking for first ACC win

first_img Published on March 26, 2014 at 11:39 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse A year after finishing his career as an elite defender on Syracuse’s back line, Brian Megill already sees things differently. Since leaving SU, he’s gained a new outlook on the game, and it’s one he wishes he had while still playing with the Orange. So a day after SU dropped its third Atlantic Coast Conference game in as many tries on Sunday, Megill emailed some of his former teammates. He’s worked through the same kind of rut the team is currently stuck in, and offered a perspective it badly needs. “I wanted to tell them that bad runs happen, but have to be stopped by the team as a whole,” Megill said. “For guys like the seniors, there isn’t a lot of time left and I lived that last year.”No. 9 Syracuse (4-3, 0-3 ACC) hosts No. 7 Notre Dame (4-2, 2-0) in the Carrier Dome at noon on Saturday, and it could be the last chance for the Orange to salvage a season that is slipping away. For SU’s senior class — notably goalie Dominic Lamolinara, attack Derek Maltz, midfielder Billy Ward and long-stick midfielder Matt Harris — the date with the Fighting Irish, and the games proceeding it, present an ultimatum of sorts. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange has six games left on its regular-season schedule. And if it doesn’t end its season-long skid soon, it won’t play into the ACC or NCAA tournament, and a handful of careers will be cut short. “We’re not happy,” SU head coach John Desko said. “We have to get better, we’re better than halfway through the season, and we have to get better as a group in almost all aspects.”The hours following SU’s 21-7 loss to Duke last Saturday were solemn. No more than 30 minutes after the final whistle, players were watching film — of them being outclassed by the Blue Devils — on their laptops in the team van. When they got on the plane, the laughing that follows road wins was absent. So was the light talking that normally follows a road loss. NCAA rules forced Desko to give the team a day off Monday, and he still hadn’t seen his players when he addressed the media before practice Tuesday afternoon. But they had seen one another. “We had a team meeting, and it was one of the more brutal team meetings I’ve ever been a part of,” Lamolinara said. “For the first time ever I think our hearts were questioned, where we are and what we want.“I mean, with the way it looked on Sunday I think it’s warranted to question where some people’s hearts are.”As has been the story all season, the next game isn’t any easier than the last. Notre Dame doubled up No. 8 Virginia 18-9 on March 16 — Syracuse lost to the Cavaliers by five goals earlier in the season — and edged No. 5 North Carolina 11-10 on March 1. UND also has the second best faceoff specialist in the country in senior Liam O’Connor, who is winning draws at a 68.5 percent clip. And in its last game against Ohio State, sophomore attack Matt Kavanagh scored a program record-tying seven goals. Syracuse, on the other hand, is still cycling six players through a faceoff rotation winning draws just 37 percent of the time. O’Connor gets to improve his torrid start against a limping group, and if he gets the Fighting Irish possession more times than not, Kavanagh will have a chance to put a dent in the scoreboard. There’s no time for Syracuse to breathe after its worst loss of the season. Just another tough test, six games and the growing possibility that that will be it.“The thought of having just six more games is mind boggling,” Lamolinara said. “I used to have that many games in a weekend at some tournaments. Looking at that has opened up our eyes to what we have in front of us.“We haven’t lost anything yet and our goals are still there.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more