Mel stands by football philosophy

first_img Press Association Albion announced on Monday they had parted company with Mel, who only took over as their head coach in January, by mutual consent. The Spaniard kept the Baggies up – they finished 17th in the Barclays Premier League, three points above the relegation zone – but he endured a troubled reign. His first victory in the job did not come until his eighth match, the team won just three games in total out of the 17 he was in charge for, and only one of those triumphs was at home. Among the difficulties he faced was striker Shane Long being sold to Hull around the time Mel arrived at The Hawthorns, and he also subsequently lost the services of Nicolas Anelka as a consequence of the ‘quenelle’ saga. In an interview with Spanish radio station Cadena SER, the 51-year-old former Real Betis boss nonetheless spoke of a “wonderful experience” managing in the English top-flight. But he also made it clear there had been issues with regard to the style he wanted West Brom to play in. Mel said: “I had talks and West Brom and I decided that the best thing was to part company. “It’s a wonderful experience (to coach in the Premier League). Anyone in their jobs should experience this, you learn lots of things. “Football is experienced differently here – it’s neither better nor worse than Spain, just different. “But I cannot betray the essence of what I consider football to be. I think it is best to end it here. “They invented football and have a certain style and culture of football that is not necessarily the idea that we have right now in Spain.” He added: “The situation at the club at the beginning of January was not stable. They had sold some players. We lost Anelka. “In a week I had lost my best two strikers. It was difficult, we had a very complicated calendar and that is why I’m very happy and proud that we had saved ourselves when everything looked ugly. “We are all happy. But I cannot continue in the same way because I cannot betray myself. They (the players) are more comfortable doing what they know, to play the way they play. “We, the coaches, depend on the players – they are the ones that give to you or take things away from you. If the players are comfortable on the pitch that is crucial. “I go back home calm, knowing that I’ve done what I was hired to do. I leave with all the affection of the people and the club. “The best for me and my future is to find another place.” Mel has been strongly linked with a return to the Primera Division with Malaga. Along with Chris Hughton and Malky Mackay, other names in the frame to succeed him include Celtic boss Neil Lennon, Tim Sherwood – relived of his duties as Tottenham boss on Tuesday – and former Baggies midfielder Derek McInnes, who is currently in charge of Aberdeen. West Brom goalkeeper Ben Foster has suggested Mel’s level of English meant “it was always difficult” but has wished him well and stressed the need for the club’s players to reflect upon their own part in Albion’s poor campaign. Foster, quoted by the Express & Star, said: “As players we also need to have a long, hard, look at ourselves because we haven’t performed this year. “I think everyone would agree it’s been quite a lucky one and we’re all quite relieved that we’ve retained our status. “It’s always a bit of a shock when a manager leaves and I’d like to pass on my regards and best wishes. “It was a tough ask for him in the first place but, whoever we’d got in, everybody would have been really happy if they’d guaranteed us Premier League safety. “It was always difficult because of the language barrier.” Pepe Mel has indicated his unwillingness to “betray” his football philosophy was key to him leaving West Brom.last_img read more

Kyle Shanahan suggests Jordan Reed could be big part of 49ers offense

first_imgIf Reed can stay on the gridiron, he would form arguably the best tight-end duo in the league along with All-Pro George Kittle.That is why Lynch felt it was worth taking a chance to bring Reed into the building.”It’s well documented he’s had multiple concussions prior,” Lynch admitted. “In situations like this, there’s a reason a guy like Jordan Reed is out there, so there is some risk-reward. We got to a point where we felt the risk that we’re taking on was worth it with the potential reward.” Kyle Shanahan predicted Jordan Reed could prove to be a fantastic acquisition for the 49ers, provided the tight end can remain healthy.Niners general manager John Lynch confirmed a report Reed had agreed terms on a one-year, incentive-laden deal with the Niners following his release by Washington. Former Washington Football Team Pro Bowl TE Jordan Reed reached agreement on an incentive-laden, one-year deal with the San Francisco 49ers, sources tell ESPN. Reed is 30, has a history of concussions, but when healthy – as he is now – he is one of the game’s elite tight ends.— Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) August 3, 2020MORE: Ranking the top 10 tight ends in the NFLThe move reunites the 30-year-old with Shanahan, his former offensive coordinator in Washington, where Reed spent the first seven years of his career, amassing 3,371 yards and 24 touchdowns.Reed’s time in the NFL so far has largely been one of unfulfilled potential owing to a spate of injuries and concussions, with his seventh known concussion keeping him out of the entire 2019 season. Yet Shanahan is optimistic about a tight end who has missed 47 games over his career.”I know he hasn’t been on the field for a little bit,” Shanahan told reporters. “I know he’s very hungry to play football. He hasn’t gotten to do much of that lately. When you have a talented guy who is hungry to play football, it works out if they can stay healthy. Jordan’s had some bad luck over the years. I know he’s ready to go. I hope he has some good luck here. If he does, I think it’s going to be a hell of a deal for the Niners, and a really good deal for him also.”last_img read more

Fire Station 4 Public Art Proposal Jury

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0The public is invited to view the final round of the jury process for public art for Fire Station 4 on Tuesday, January 24, at 6pm at the Main Fire Station Training Room, 100 Eastside St NE.  In addition, the public is invited to provide comment to the jury for their deliberation after conclusion of the presentations that evening.  The purpose of this jury, comprised of five members of the Olympia Arts Commission, is to make a final recommendation among the three proposals.  Proposals will be made by public artists Judith & Daniel Caldwell, Peter Reiquam and Haiying Wu.  The recommendation from this jury will go to the Olympia City Council on February 14 for final approval.  Following Council approval, the selected art proposal will be fabricated and installed.  For more information, please contact Stephanie Johnson, Arts & Events Manager, at 709-2678.last_img read more

Seattle Fire Department At Satsop’s Tunnel Rescue Training Complex

first_imgThe Park is managed by the Grays Harbor Public Development Authority, a public corporation whose mission is to create new jobs and investment for the region. More information on Satsop Business Park can be found at www.Satsop.com. Submitted by Satsop Business ParkSatsop Business Park staff have dug 27 feet down beneath the never-used nuclear power site and exposed part of the huge pipes underneath. They’ve created a tunnel rescue training complex that the Seattle Fire Department will begin using Oct. 15.ELMA – Satsop Business Park has dug up some “buried treasure” that will likely help save lives. The “treasure” is a pair of enormous underground pipes that have now been transformed into a tunnel rescue training complex.The week of Oct. 15, about 30 members of the Seattle Fire Department will be the first to use the 12-foot diameter pipes to conduct specialized tunnel safety and rescue training. The department has said it will use the new training center about 30 days a year. Observers from the New York Fire Department will also be attending.“There is nowhere in the United States that has the potential for tunnel training as this place does with its 12-foot tunnels,” said Alan Vickery, assistant chief of the Seattle Fire Department. “These pipes are similar to the real world of tunneling work that is taking place in the Seattle area as well as internationally. Nothing that I’m aware of in the U.S. even compares,” he said.Located 27 feet below the ground, the pair of parallel water pipes was intended to carry water to and from the nuclear power plants’ twin cooling towers. To create the training prop, one was dissected and the other was opened up to allow for three separate areas to set up various training scenarios. Digging out a portion of the pipe, dissecting the one pipe and installing needed safety systems cost Satsop Business Park about $200,000.“To create a rescue training complex like this from scratch would cost millions of dollars,” said Tami Garrow, CEO of Satsop Business Park. (When the pipes were installed in 1979, the cost was $7 million.) “But at Satsop, we have this valuable infrastructure right beneath our feet that will benefit tunnel construction workers, repair crews, a wide range of rescue workers and the general public.“Redeploying these pipes for training purposes makes all kinds of sense when you think about it – and like everything else at the Park, it is recycling at its most creative.  It’s like uncovering a valuable resource that we know is already here, in this case, one that can help save lives and prevent injuries,” Garrow saidThe Seattle Fire Department has been contracted to provide tunnel rescue service for the Sound Transit Light Rail System, Assistant Chief Vickery said. This new site will be set up to deliver more realistic training scenarios – and thus make it safer for tunnel workers and firefighters who are called to the scene of a tunnel emergency, he said.Just a stone’s throw away from the recently completed tunnel rescue site, under the shadow of the operational cooling tower, is an outdoor tunnel construction training site being created by the Northwest Laborers-Employers Training Trust. That facility, complete with classrooms and a now-retired tunnel boring machine, nicknamed “Helene,” was created to teach tunnel workers how to safely operate in tunnels.“Having this tunnel training rescue site at the Park dovetails nicely with what we’re doing to create a national tunnel training complex, said Mike Warren, the training director of the Northwest Laborers-Employers Training Trust. “I can see fire departments from across the U.S. and Canada coming to Satsop to train. It will be a very unique set up. Tunnel rescue training will be provided to union laborers as well.” The Laborers-Employers Training Trust also plans to use the tunnels for about 30 days a year, he said.In addition to the Seattle Fire Department and Laborers-Employers Training Trust, there is growing interest by many other fire departments and safety organizations exploring the use of the tunnel rescue complex, said Nathan Hoover, project coordinator.“A lot of organizations go to West Virginia to get rescue training. We can save those on the West Coast a lot of money in travel expenses alone,” said Hoover. “We’re expecting that the Army, which already does lots of training here, will be interested in the tunnels. In addition, we can see easily adding some structures in the future to create scenarios for high-angle rescue training someday.”“I think this is a great opportunity for Satsop Business Park,” said Steve Poler, Chairman of the Board. “Anytime we can add a world-class training site to the Park it’s great, and to have something like this that is so different, where you can do things you can’t do anywhere else in the country is very exciting,” Poler said.Satsop Business Park is a 1,700-acre mixed-use business and technology park located in scenic Grays Harbor County in Southwest Washington just 30 minutes from Olympia and the I-5 corridor. It is home to more than 30 businesses, offers 440 acres of developed, pad-ready land and buildings supported by super-sized infrastructure and surrounded by 1,200 acres of sustainable managed forestland. Facebook3Tweet0Pin1last_img read more