Storms hit; students take cover

first_imgStudents took cover in the lowest level of buildings for about an hour and a half Tuesday morning after the University issued a campus-wide alert notifying the community of a tornado threat. The University informed students via e-mail, phone calls, text messages and overhead announcements to take cover. The messages called the threat “imminent.” No tornado occurred, but winds reached more than 70 mph, the South Bend Tribune reported. University spokesman Dennis Brown said there was no damage on campus besides “a couple branches [down] here and there.” Brown said the branches did not hit any buildings and he was not aware of any trees that came down. The University sent out the first alert around 9:10 a.m. and asked everyone on campus to go to the lowest level of a building. A second message was sent out at 10:26 a.m. reporting that the warning had been extended. The University gave the “all clear” for students to return to normal activity at 10:46 a.m., Brown said. Brown said the “redundancy” of the alerts — through text messages, phone calls, e-mail, the University website and the public address system — was effective in getting the word out to students, faculty and staff. The public address system, which was activated last spring, was a “very effective tool” for making an emergency announcement, Brown said. “I think for the most part the combination of tools that we used to alert the campus worked well,” he said. “It was a disruption this morning, but I think most people were able to cope and go to the lowest level and wait it out.”last_img read more

Social media connects world to conclave

first_imgAlthough the College of Cardinals used a smoke signal Wednesday to signal its election of a new pope, the rest of the world relied on social media to stay updated on the conclave. Junior Austin Lagomarsino said he first heard the news on Facebook when a friend posted “Habemus Papam” as his status. “I followed [the conclave] on Facebook, but the best one to follow was Fr. Edward Sorin on Twitter,” Lagomarsino said. The fake Fr. Edward Sorin account tweeted Wednesday at 9:02 a.m. EST, “If the tailgating in Saint Peter’s Square gets out of hand, no more night-popes for a while.” Social media outlets such as Twitter and Instagram did not exist when Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI was elected in 2005. But since the conclave began Tuesday, thousands of mobile devices tweeted photos each time the smoke appeared, whether it was black or white. Senior Catherine Flatley said she found out about the new pope through social media and then turned to news media sources like the New York Times. “I didn’t realize so many of my peers followed [the conclave] closely,” she said. “I saw posts on Facebook and Tweets, but I went and actually read about it via the news.” Mobile applications created for the conclave were available within 48 hours of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI’s resignation, according to a report from CNN. One application, Conclave, by Logos Bible Software, provided free updates, live video from Saint Peter’s Square and historical information about the election process. PopeAlarm.com, developed by the Fellowship of Catholic University Students, promised to update users whenever the smoke appeared via SMS and the website’s Twitter handle, @popealarm. FantasyConclave.com, a website based on sports brackets, allowed users to select a cardinal and enter a pool with the chance to win prizes, some valued more than $300. Some of the cardinals joined the Twitter community as they discussed the conclave, including Archbishop of Los Angeles Roger Mahoney, who tweeted at 7:07 p.m. March 11, “Last tweet before moving to Casa Santa Martha, and Mass to Elect a Pope. First Conclave meeting late Tuesday afternoon. Prayers needed.” Crews installed mobile device jammers in the Sistine Chapel and the residences at the Santa Marta hotel to prevent the news from leaking out preemptively, according to a report by NBC. Sr. Mary Ann Walsh, spokeswoman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, told The Telegraph of London, “In this electronic age, I worry some cardinals may go into iPad and Twitter withdrawal.” Any cardinal or Vatican worker who breached the security code would face excommunication, according to The Telegraph. When the newly-elected Pope Francis finally stepped onto the balcony, the Twitter sphere exploded with exclamations of “Habemus Papam” and “Francisco Primo”. Twitter users started using the handle @JMBergoglio, which existed long before the new pontiff’s candidacy for the papacy, to congratulate him, according to a report from NBC. Twitter had to suspend the account when it nearly doubled in followers within a few hours of the announcement. The account was allegedly a fake account, according to Slate Magazine. Pope Francis will inherit not only Saint Peter’s throne but also @Pontifex, the pope’s official Twitter account. The account has 1,819,926 followers and counting, and has produced one tweet at 7:33 CET on March 13. The tweet reads, “HABEMUS PAPAM FRANCISCUM”.last_img read more

Notre Dame pilgrims spend Easter at Vatican

first_imgROME – This Easter, more than 100 Notre Dame students studying in various locations throughout Europe went on pilgrimage to Rome for a weekend of sightseeing, prayer and reflection organized by Campus Ministry. John Paul Lichon, campus minister and retreats director, met the pilgrims in Saint Peter’s Square on Saturday afternoon to distribute tickets for the Easter Sunday Mass. Students from programs all over Europe – including in Greece, Spain, England, Ireland and Italy – reunited by the obelisk in the middle of the piazza, hugging, laughing and sharing stories from their travels. The pilgrimage is an annual event coordinated by Campus Ministry, which includes tours of Rome’s churches, admittance to the Easter Sunday Mass led by Pope Francis and the opportunity to reflect in the presence of Rome’s most precious relics, Lichon said. Easter is the most important feast of the year for the Church, Lichon said, but the pilgrimage will take on special significance this year. “We’ve been doing the pilgrimage for a long time, but it just turned out this year it was with the new pope, so that has been exciting,” Lichon said. “The main focus is truly to be on pilgrimage for Easter, to truly enter into Triduum.” Lichon said Campus Ministry offered two pilgrimage “tracks.” The full track includes three days of sightseeing and guided reflection, while the Easter Sunday track admits students only for the Mass in Saint Peter’s Square, Lichon said. “It’s been fantastic. There’re about 40 students doing the full track with us, and we did the whole Triduum service together. We did a bunch of churches together on Friday, we did Saint Peter’s [Saturday] morning and we’re going to do the Vatican Museum,” he said. “Then about 110 students are coming just for the Easter Sunday Mass.” Though the tours and photo opportunities excite the participants, Lichon said the goal of the pilgrimage was to engage in prayer. “Rome at this time is just crazy, and we wanted to create a space that was prayerful and reflective and truly enter into Triduum,” he said. “I think that’s what this week is really about.” Junior Caity Bobber, who is studying abroad in London, participated in all of the pilgrimage’s planned events. “We began [Friday] with morning prayer at the Coliseum, and we saw the Basilica of Saint John Lateran, where the skulls of Saints Peter and Paul are,” Bobber said. “It’s actually where the bishop of Rome is, so that’s the cathedral of Rome.” Each day of the pilgrimage is scheduled from 7 a.m. until late at night, while some days stretch past midnight, Bobber said. “Last night, the Stations of the Cross began at 9:15 p.m., but we met at 6:45 p.m. to wait for our spot,” Bobber said. “It was a jam-packed day.” Mary Coghlin, a junior studying abroad in London, said visiting the Holy Stairs held special religious significance for her. “I would say we were all surprised by that,” Coghlin said. “It’s 28 stairs taken from the office of Pontius Pilate, so when Jesus was walking to his condemnation, he was walking down those stairs.” Coghlin said Saint Helen, Constantine’s mother, moved the stairs and other elements of Christ’s crucifixion back to Rome. “It’s the original marble, and now they’re covered in another wood, and pilgrims go up each of these 28 steps on their knees while praying. It’s about a 25-minute ordeal,” she said. “It’s way more moving than you would expect. People did specific prayers, acts of contrition. Some people received indulgences.” The students also attended the Via Crucis, the Way of the Cross ceremony, held at the Coliseum on Friday night, Coghlin said. “It was candlelit and we were close to Papa Francesco and it was beautiful,” Coughlin said. “[In the ceremony] there was Italian and a lot of Latin, which was nice because you were able to say the Our Father in that. There were also a lot of Notre Dame people there, and it was a great day.” The group’s intense touring schedule didn’t leave the pilgrims much free time, but Lichon said the group purposefully walked a fine line between seeing Rome as tourists and visiting the churches as worshippers. “You visit the churches for a purpose, you don’t just walk in and take a picture,” he said. “You [try to] understand what this church brings to you in a special way. You ask, how is God trying to speak to you through this place?” Contact Meghan Thomassen at [email protected]last_img read more

Experts discuss Pope’s impact

first_img Wiedower said Francis’ vision of the Church emphasizes solidarity with the poor and marginalized. O’Malley said the renewal of the Church occurs at the “existential margins” of the Church, an idea which he said Pope Francis continually expresses. Daley closed the Notre Dame panel by saying the interview must be understood in a context of love, and that while Pope Francis still believes in the rules and doctrine of the Church, these rules and beliefs must be grounded in a position of love. The Notre Dame discussion was hosted by Campus Ministry and titled “What did he just say?! Pope Francis Unfiltered” The panel featured Theology Professor Fr. Brian Daley, S.J., Kathleen Cummings, director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism and Tim O’Malley, director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy. “What he’s saying is stop worrying about how I’m going to change the Curia, and if you want the renewal of the Church, go to the existential margins,” O’Malley said. “The renewal of the Church doesn’t occur, as Francis is very clear in this interview, solely through hierarchical structures.” O’Malley said interviews are still important, but they do not play as large a role as the media seems to believe they do. “Pope Francis’ message is very uplifting, one that calls for healing and seeks love and refuge.” “Interviews don’t renew the Church. If interviews changed everything, necessarily, then Barack Obama would have solved the Congressional problem by now. [But] I’m not saying that interviews aren’t important,” he said. “The important thing about them is not that they’re rules, but that they embody a love that God has given to us,” Daley said. “And so I think getting your priorities straight is really part of the rhetoric of this and what [Pope Francis] wants to communicate.” At the Notre Dame panel, the group offered general thoughts on the impact of Pope Francis’s interview before opening the discussion to audience members, giving particular focus to the role of the media in the Church and Francis’s papacy. Cummings said one of the ways in which Pope Francis suggested this reform in the interview was with regard to the role of women in the Church. Daley, a Jesuit priest, said he thought Francis’ mission as Pope would not be centered on doing such interviews.center_img In light of Pope Francis’s recent, extensive interview in “America” magazine, groups at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s hosted separate panel discussions Monday to discuss the pope’s comments and their impact on the Catholic Church and on the faith lives of students. Cummings said she believed the interview marked the beginning of a reform movement led by Pope Francis. “He did talk about the need for a profound theology of womanhood that the Church does not yet have,” Cummings said. “I think my biggest takeaway from it, as someone who is interested in what this portends for the future of the Church, is that Pope Francis has made pretty clear … that he is preparing the faithful for a fairly significant program of reform, and he’s tipped his hand in the interview toward that in a variety of ways,” Cummings said. Cummings cited a direct quote from the interview in “America” in which Pope Francis said, “We should not even think … that ‘thinking with the church’ means only thinking with the hierarchy of the church.” At the Saint Mary’s panel, Piecuch said it is valuable to think of the Church as a field hospital, taking care of all. “I think giving interviews will not be the way to [accomplish Francis’s goals]. Some of these have been good, but it’s time now to kind of quiet down and do some other things,” Daley said. “My initial feeling about this interview was one of hope, ‘mustard seed’-type hope,” Wiedower said. The Saint Mary’s panel featured Sr. Veronique Wiedower, vice president for mission, Phyllis Kaminski, professor of Religious Studies, sophomore Sofia Piecuch and senior Haley Koth. “This is a call to take time to truly listen to people,” she said. “The Church is meant to bring us together rather than divide.”last_img read more

Researchers publish cross-disciplinary biological study

first_imgIn a cross-disciplinary effort, Notre Dame biology and mathematics professors have published a study on stathmin, a key protein in the cytoskeleton, demonstrating the success of mathematical computer modeling and lab work in photographing of stathmin.Notre Dame associate professor of biochemistry Holly Goodson recently published the study in conjunction with professor of applied mathematics Mark Alber. “Mark Alber’s lab specializes in doing biological modeling and they had already approached us about the possibility of trying to put something together with this,” Goodson said. “We’ve actually been working on this for quite a long time. The models had to start very simply and we’ve built complexity over time.”In developing the mathematical model, Goodson said the goal was to create a system that was not overly complex. “The first thing we’re looking for is just general behavior,” she said. “Then you can add extra levels of details to make it more precise. One of the main things you can get out of something like this is to figure out what really matters.”Using computational models in a systems biology approach indirectly tests and observes conceptual models of the dynamic subcellular system, Goodson said. Although electron microscopes can capture images nanometers in size, such pictures are often incomplete, she said.“It’s like trying to understand a football game: if you’re trying to figure out football from a hundred random snapshots of the game, you would never see anything interesting,” Goodson said. “You would never see a touchdown, it would never happen. That’s kind of like electron microscopy: it’s hard to figure out what’s really going from these snapshots frozen in time.”Stathmin plays a crucial role in the destruction and uptake of microtubules, Goodson said, a dynamic, continuous process that is difficult to track. Her lab formulated conceptual ideas for the mechanism of this process, Goodman said, and obtained only limited evidence by traditional biochemical means.“It was frustrating because we couldn’t really figure out how to test if these ideas were correct,” Goodson said. “It goes back to the saying that you don’t really understand something until you can predict it quantitatively. “It’s too complicated a system to write down mathematical models — all we really know is how the individual pieces interact, but we don’t really know how that would give rise to specific predictions about the behavior of the system other than that ‘it grows’ or ‘it falls apart.’”Goodson said she studied computational biology as a rotation student working on modeling protein ­folding in the lab of Michael Levitt, one of the winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.Goodson said she believes computational and inter­disciplinary approaches are the way of the future in biology, as shown by joint efforts of Notre Dame’s biochemistry and mathematics departments.“This is an example of why it’s important for people in a variety of sciences to be learning something about biology because there’s a lot of science that’s going to be done in the next 20 years or so at this interface between biology and the other sciences,” she said.Tags: Biological Modelinglast_img read more

Band restructures Irish Guard

first_imgKevin Song | The Observer The Irish Guard performs alongside the Band of the Fighting Irish in the Sept. 8, 2012, game against Purdue. The Guard has been restructured to include band members only, eliminating the height requirement of 6’2”.Pemberton said he was concerned that the changes could affect the history and tradition of the Guard, which has existed since 1949, according to the band website.“I would hope that the significance of the Irish Guard within the band would become more prominent as a result of these changes, as that was their intended effect, but I can’t help but feel that [the Guard’s] significance on campus and as a symbol of the strength, integrity and athleticism of Notre Dame and of the Fighting Irish will slowly diminish as a result of these changes,” Pemberton said. “Regarding its legacy, this may be the end of a long line of Guardsmen who, for 65 years, have passed down the stories, techniques and respect for the uniform that originated with John Fyfe.”“While there will still be kilted members of the band to lead it onto the field and perhaps perform Damsha Bua, our victory clog, much of the lore and pageantry that has become a large part of the pregame ritual on fall Saturdays will be lost,” he said. “There are a lot of little things that go on that spectators wouldn’t necessary notice, but have become very significant for Guardsmen and their friends and families.“For example, just as the band is setting up for [the] concert on the steps and before we march in our ranks onto Bond Quad to meet them, we take a moment to halt in the middle of God Quad and salute Mary on top of the Golden Dome. It’s the little things that make marching out every week so special to all of us and to all of the Guard alumni — many of whom come back to greet us every week and treat us as their own kids.”The Irish Guard began as a group of students who played bagpipes with the band, according to the band website. Dye said drawing members from current band members would move the group closer to its historical tradition.“[We are] going back to where it started, where [Irish Guard members] were musicians in the band,” he said. “That was continued for a couple of decades and then it strayed from there. It does have musical roots, and we are going back to our roots.”Dye said no other eligibility requirements would be changed other than the elimination of a specific height requirement.“Next year’s Guard will all be very tall in stature, but we don’t want to put a number on a person,” he said. “So next year’s Guard will probably be visibly just as tall, but we … don’t want to ever number a person because a lot of it depends on their poise and how they stand and their posture and we want to make sure that there is a uniformity in look — that we maintain that tradition — but we don’t want to put a number on it.”Dye said the new process will allow for more leadership opportunities within the band, a large group that he said has proportionally fewer leadership roles than other campus clubs. He said changing the policies to require one year of service in the band as a performer or manager will allow potential Guard members to demonstrate their commitment to the group.“We’re looking for the qualities of the student,” Dye said. “We’re looking for a student that has fabulous service to the band and the community, great attendance and citizenship in the band — someone that has proven themselves in the organization for a minimum of one year, preferably longer. With the current system, there really isn’t that time to assess their leadership qualities and participation in the band.”Dye said he hopes making the Irish Guard a more leadership-focused position within the band will give the position added prestige.“We hope that [new Irish Guard members] are model band students and model Notre Dame students, so that when you say ‘Irish Guard,’ and you’re interviewing for job, that this is the kind of person you want for a manager or a CEO of a company,” he said.Associate News Editor Jack Rooney contributed to this report.Tags: history, Irish Guard, Kenneth Dye, marching band, Notre Dame, tradition The Irish Guard, the kilted group of marchers who meet a six-foot-two height requirement and perform with the Band of the Fighting Irish, has undergone significant changes for the upcoming football season, Guard captain and junior Andrew Pemberton said.“The Irish Guard will continue to be a section within the band, but will now be reserved for members who demonstrate at least one year of service and leadership as a musician or manager,” Pemberton said in an email. “The new plan likens the Irish Guard to drum majors or band president, with the goal of making membership in the Irish Guard a one-year honorary position.”Dr. Kenneth Dye, director of bands, confirmed the change in the selection process for new Guard members. He said the band staff invited the 2013 Guard members to audition for the 2014 football season but chose to select an entirely new group from current band members based on the idea that serving on the Guard will now be a one- to two-year commitment.“We interviewed the [previous Guard members] who decided to apply and then we told them recently that we were going to start with a new group,” Dye said. “… The idea is not to have four-year Irish Guard members or three-year Irish Guard members.“We want to limit it to something that is done as a special leadership opportunity that is perhaps one or two years in duration. [The 2013] group has already served one or two years, and we thought that that was fair.”Dye said he and the band staff, with the approval of the Office of Student Affairs, believe restricting membership in the Irish Guard to current band members and managers will increase their level of commitment to the specialized group.“We’re trying to elevate the responsibility of the Guard so that they exemplify the best qualities of a Notre Dame student,” he said. “… If we pick from the membership of the [2013] Guard rather than from an auditioning membership at the beginning of the fall, then we know what their record and habits and citizenship are, and it gives us a stronger pool of applicants and participants to really put the best people that we have in front of the band.”last_img read more

Notre Dame staff supports Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger drive

first_imgAcross the country, Hunger Action month spans throughout September, educating the nation about widespread hunger in the United States and fighting to help those in need. Many members of Notre Dame’s community have come together the past nine years to conduct the food drive, Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger, each September to raise money and awareness for the same cause, with proceeds going towards two groups: the People Gotta Eat initiative, under United Way of St. Joseph County, and the Food Bank of Northern Indiana. The drive seeking donations will run from September 9 to 29. Anne Kolaczyk, chair of the event, noted one in four kids in northern Indiana go to bed hungry each night. The funds raised for the Food Bank of Northern Indiana will go towards a specific “backpack program,” she said.“[The backpack program] gives kids in need a backpack of food to take home with them over the weekend, so that they have food to eat over the weekend,” Kolaczyk said. Kolaczyk explained the drive is largely run by Notre Dame staff, rather than students. “This is not one of the sanctioned charities that Notre Dame collects money for,” Kolaczyk said. “This is basically just kind of a grassroots effort to ease the hunger situation in the community.”She said the drive is a group effort among many departments, coordinated by Kolaczyk, to collect money for the two initiatives. However, there are some individuals who work apart from their departments to raise money for the initiatives. “There are many people across campus whose departments are not doing anything [with the drive] because they can’t spare the time or the manpower, but they still donate,” Kolaczyk said. She explained that, while some departments go all out and try to raise money, there are many individuals on campus who donate directly to the initiative websites rather than departmental fundraising. Kolaczyk, who works in OIT, explained how her department raises funds for the event. “I plan different things. Somebody donated some tickets to [a home football game this season], so I offered them for sale and somebody bought them,” she said. “I was able to take that money and it will go into the pot that goes to the food drive.”She said the OIT department runs a pot-luck pizza, salad and desert lunch to collect money for the drive. “We usually raise about 400 dollars that way,” Kolaczyk said. The finance division also participates in the Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger challenge. Mark Zeese, who works in the controller’s office in the finance division, said the finance division divides everyone into teams for a “loose change challenge.”“In essence, everybody throws in their loose change or dollar bills … that goes towards their team totals,” Zeese said. “As kind of an incentive or reward, our employees are allowed to wear blue jeans on Friday, which is kind of special because we obviously dress professional during the school year.”Zeese said when people notice the employees wearing blue jeans, it serves as a reminder that September is Hunger Awareness month.  Among the hundred or so employees, the teams collectively raise $1000 to $1300 each year for Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger, Zeese said. Kolaczyk said monetary donations to food bank can be more beneficial to those in need, rather than buying canned goods and other food items.  “One dollar that’s donated can provide up to eight or nine meals for someone just because the food bank and the food pantries have so much buying power that if we went out and we bought a jar of spaghetti sauce and some pasta we might spend three dollars, where with three dollars [they] can do so much more because they can buy things at a discount,” Kolaczyk said. “That’s why we mainly ask for money not for food.”There will also be a collection for Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger at the game day Mass on Sunday following the New Mexico game. Tags: Food Bank of Northern Indiana, food drive, Hunger action month, people gotta eatlast_img read more

Native American Alumni Board working to award first-ever scholarship

first_imgThe Native American Alumni Board is looking to award its first-ever scholarship in 2020 thanks to generous donations from alumni and others in the Notre Dame community.The scholarship fund is one of a few initiatives the board and the University have undertaken in order to foster a more inclusive environment for Native students and show reverence for Native culture.Theresa Tulsiak | The Observer The scholarship fund has raised $7,964.79, which is very close to the $10,000 needed to sustain the scholarship, said Anthony Holt, chair of the alumni board and a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians.“These specific scholarship funds require $10,000 of deposited money before the scholarship can be awarded — that can come through any number of donations,” Holt said. “The University puts the money into investment funds [so] as it comes in it’s gaining money.”Holt said the market value of the $7,964 is actually much higher, amounting to around $11,000.The Native American Alumni Board started working with the Office of Financial Aid in 2011. In 2012, the board officially learned the scholarship had been approved and that it could start taking donations in October 2012.“We already had a number of Native American alumni and others who had basically donated money,” he said.Charitable days of donation at the University, such as Notre Dame Day, also help to fundraise for the scholarship.“ND Day has been really helpful for us year after year,” Holt said. “It’s a great day of fundraising for us that we hope will maintain attention towards our alumni board and the work that’s been done.”Holt said the undergraduate work of architecture students in Navajo Nation has greatly impacted the amount of donations the scholarship has received. The projects gained even more visibility through the What Would You Fight For series, which aims to showcase the work and impact of community members.Deswood Etsitty, director of alumni relations for the board, was essential in realizing the partnership, which gave Notre Dame architecture students real-world experience while helping a school fund a new gymnasium.The Native American Alumni Board is overseen by the Notre Dame Alumni Diversity Council. The board began around 2005 and Holt said it is the youngest and smallest of the multicultural alumni boards.The board has been working closely with the Office of Financial Aid to ensure the scholarship will be sustainable in the future and will be awarded to students with the most need.“The financial aid office wants to ensure that the market value stays over $10,000 for the first couple of years until it can gain more market value,” Holt said. “Initially, the scholarships awarded will be small, in the $500 range, but this can help take care of books and smaller essential things. The office has a pool of applicable candidates, typically students who have financial need and are Native students.”Holt feels the scholarship is a way to acknowledge both the history of the Pokagon Potawatomi in the area and the Native students who attend the University.“We are on the Pokagon Potawatomi’s traditional land and it’s important to maintain the acknowledgement of that history,” he said. “This scholarship is an acknowledgement there are still Native students coming to Notre Dame and there are things the board and the University are doing to encourage students to come to Notre Dame. We do have Natives here in the student population and the alumni population and we do care about this community.”But cultural specialist and Pokagon tribe activist Jefferson Ballew IV said he feels the University is still doing little for the Pokagon Potawatomi. He spoke of the early days of the University, and the transference of land between Peter Pokagon, Leopold Pokagon’s grandson, and Fr. Stephen Badin.“Peter gave it all to Fr. Badin so [the Pokagons] wouldn’t have been forcibly removed from their homeland,” Ballew IV said.Ballew IV said the University offered the Pokagon Potawatomi food, clothing and education in exchange for the land, but Notre Dame was “supposed to be doing that work anyway.”“That kind of charitable work is nothing extraordinary,” he said. “Those are things that the Catholic Church already does — where is the above and beyond? The sacrifice? The atonement? None of that was given to us.”Holt believes there are many at Notre Dame who are working to make the University “a positive place for students.”“Folks out there within the Notre Dame community are improving relationships with the Native American community and [University President] Fr. [John] Jenkins has been a huge part of furthering this positive momentum and fostering necessary conversations,” Holt said.Tags: native, native american alumni board, Native Americans, Pokagon Potawatomi, scholarshiplast_img read more

Jenkins holds town hall, announces advisory task force for off-campus students

first_imgIn a virtual town hall for off-campus undergraduate students Wednesday, University President Fr. John Jenkins acknowledged the shortcomings of the University’s preparation to reopen in light of COVID-19, but he said he believes the changes Notre Dame has undergone in the past few weeks will allow the University to be better prepared to keep students, faculty and staff safe and on campus for the semester.Jenkins began the session by announcing the creation of an advisory task force for off-campus undergraduate students to address their needs during this time and to maintain a line of communication between them and the administration.Vice president of University relations Louis Nanni said the task force will be composed of 25 to 30 students from each of the different pods of student housing areas.“Our charge, I believe, is to really try to enhance a sense of belonging and inclusiveness with all of you,” Nanni said.When asked what it will take for students to remain on campus, Jenkins spoke about the cycle of infections. “If we get into a cycle where there’s not just a few infections, but they’re infecting others and we go to the second circle, and the third circle, and the fourth circle,” Jenkins said. “We can’t deal with that; we don’t have the capacity to deal with it, and that would cause us to start online classes or maybe even have to go home.”Jenkins remains optimistic though that students will be able to remain on campus for the rest of the semester.“I believe in the student body — they’re smart, they care about each other, they care about the University,” Jenkins said. “That is our great asset.”According to vice president of student affairs Erin Hoffman Harding, there will be no restrictions for off-campus students coming to campus as students return to in-person classes.She also stated the University plans on requesting students limit gatherings to 10 people for the immediate future. “We’re going to start cautiously,” she said. “It’s the reason we’re starting classes gradually. We are also reopening student organizations and programs gradually so we can all be successful.”As the University recently announced, student, faculty and staff football ticket availability for the coming season, vice president for campus safety and University operations Mike Seamon talked about the administration’s considerations behind this decision.“The idea was to not bring outside visitors to campus,” Seamon said.Students, faculty and staff may park on the stadium lot, and tailgating will not be permitted on campus. Jenkins reiterated how fortunate Notre Dame is to allow the student body in the stadium while the vast majority of other colleges in the ACC are not allowing their students the same opportunity.“I just want to urge you to bring your best selves and cheer, but obey those health precautions so we can continue with the season and continue to have spectators,” Jenkins said.When asked what students should do if they see their peers disregarding safety precautions Hoffman Harding said to look to GreeNDot’s strategy.“If you see something, say something,” Hoffman Harding said. “I know and have certainly seen since we came back this semester how much our students want to be here. If we can all encourage one another wherever we are on campus and just remind ourselves and each other to put on our masks, keep our distance, do our daily health checks, come to surveillance testing. That is really the way that we are all going to be successful in staying here.” Student body president senior Rachel Ingal, who moderated the event, asked if University leadership will consider shortening the time a student remains in quarantine if they do not test positive for COVID-19.Seamon responded and said he does not see the amount of time a student in quarantine who was in close contact with individuals who tested positive to decrease less than seven days. This is only possible because of the infrastructure Notre Dame has in place, including the information from the daily health checks, the contact tracing and the testing center.In addition, Hoffman Harding reminded off-campus students that all community members will be required to get flu shots later in the semester. “That’s another prevention and safety measure that we put in place for campus so that we can make sure to prevent that illness and any confusion that you might see in symptoms between the flu and COVID,” she said.To wrap up the town hall, Jenkins reminded everyone to continue wearing masks, social distancing, completing their daily health checks and showing up to surveillance testing.“You guys work so hard and you want to relax and on weekends you want to take it easy, I get it, but that’s the most risky time,” Jenkins said. “So find ways to relax, find ways to be with your friends that are safe. It doesn’t take much to shut us down for the semester.” Tags: COVID-19, fall 2020, Fr. John Jenkins, off campus students, town halllast_img read more

Chautauqua County Issues Code Blue Warning

first_imgWNY News Now Image.MAYVILLE – Cold temperatures and frigid wind chills have prompted the Chautauqua County Department of Health and Human Services to issue a Code Blue Warning.This warning is triggered when temperatures reach 32 degrees or lower and requires shelter access to anyone in need of assistance.During normal business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, people seeking emergency shelter should report to the Department of Health and Human Services offices in Dunkirk or Jamestown where emergency shelter will be arranged.After normal business hours and on weekends and holidays, persons seeking emergency shelter or those who know of someone who is in need of emergency shelter or who is experiencing homelessness should contact the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office by dialing 911 and shelter assistance will be provided. Assistance will also be provided by any local law enforcement agency in Chautauqua County.The following agencies are also able to assist with Code Blue placements in Chautauqua County:Brooks Hospital, UPMC Chautauqua Hospital and The Chautauqua County Department of Mental Hygiene;The United Christian Advocacy Network (UCAN) City Mission can be utilized by adult males and is located at 7 West First Street, Jamestown, and may be contacted by calling (716) 488-7480.In addition, the following Chautauqua County warming centers may be open during the following hours and at the following locations. It is strongly encouraged that people seeking warming center assistance contact the site to determine specific hours and closures: Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more