Vermont House passes government transparency bill

first_imgThe Vermont House of Representatives has passed H.73, a bill increases transparency and accountability in state government.  The legislation will provide for greater access to public records and allow for better enforcement of the Vermont Public Records Act (PRA). The public records law as it currently stands is very complex and full of exemptions, making  enforcement inconsistent across agencies.  H. 73 seeks to make access to public records more readily available and the process understandable. The bill also sets up a process to review the necessity of current exemptions. ‘The current public records act is confusing for both individuals requesting access to records and those agencies providing the records,’ said Speaker Shap Smith.  ‘By clarifying current law, state government  will be more responsive to its citizens’with transparency, efficiency and accountability.’ Designed to address the current shortfalls of the PRA, H.73 contains the following provisions: ·        Creates public records training for all public agencies;·        Establishes a resource at the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration to provide guidance and advice to municipalities for complying with the PRA;·        Clarifies the agencies’ responsibilities to respond to a records request;·        Forms a study committee to evaluate and recommend changes to the 215 exemptions of the PRA. The bill advanced in the House to third reading yesterday, 134-5.  The bill passed this afternoon on a strong voice vote.  It has been sent to the Senate for its consideration.Source: Speaker’s office. 5.7.2011last_img read more

Undiscovered Hikes on the Appalachian Trail

first_imgPrintHit the Appalachian Trail on a warm weekend and you might think there are no secrets left along this 2,180-mile trail. After all, a visit to one of the A.T.’s hotspots like McAfee Knob or the Roan Highlands can leave you feeling awestruck by the crowds alone. But contrary to popular belief, hikers can still find solitude on the A.T. Here are the last great undiscovered hikes on the world’s most famous footpath.Siler Bald, N.C. Not to be confused with Siler’s Bald in the Smokies (though it’s named after the same family), Siler sits south of the uber-popular Nantahala River and yet, the legitimate high-elevation bald sees a fraction of the hikers that flock to its nearby counterparts.“People go to Wayah Gap and hike north to Wayah Bald and its fire tower. Hike the other direction, and you’ll hit Siler Bald, which has just as good of a view,” says Andrew Downs, trail resource manager for the Appalachian Trail in North Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia. Downs adds that in general, any part of the A.T. south of the Nantahala River is going to be less crowded than the trail to the north between the river and Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Access is limited because of the presence of the Southern Nantahala Wilderness Area and the biggest population center south of the Nantahala River is Franklin, which isn’t exactly a metropolis.Siler has the goods hikers crave. At 5,216 feet high, the grassy mountaintop gives you a 360-degree view that stretches into Georgia to the south, includes a piece of Lake Nantahala to the west, and the Wayah Bald fire tower to the north. Expect wildflowers around the bald during the spring and blueberries in the fall.Logistics: Park at Wayah Gap and hike two miles south to Siler Bald. The climbing is gradual and the payoff is big. Turn the trek into a multi-day by continuing 14 miles south to Albert Mountain, where a fire tower will give you another nearly mile-high 360-degree view. An abundance of shelters in this stretch will help keep your pack light.White Rocks and Blackstack Cliffs, Tenn./N.C. This section of the A.T. follows the North Carolina and Tennessee border, tracing the crest of the Bald Mountains Range that divides the two states. Interstate 26 is nearby, as are a few recreation areas popular with equestrians, but the Appalachian Trail hugs the ridgeline, too far removed from any large population centers to attract the casual hiker. So the views you’ll bag from the A.T.’s rocky outcroppings will be all your own.An eight-mile lollipop loop will deliver you to stunning views from two separate cliff bands and take you over the most underrated ridge walk on the trail. White Rocks Cliff is a quartzite outcropping on the Tennessee side of the trail with views into Greenville, Tennessee below. Blackstack Cliffs is a similar outcropping on the opposite side of the trail with a big view into Pisgah National Forest in North Carolina. Shortly after hitting these two cliffs, you’ll find yourself climbing the stone steps to Firescald Ridge, for nearly two miles of narrow ridge walking and rock hopping with endless views in all directions.Logistics: Pick up the A.T. six miles north of Allen Gap at Camp Creek Bald, then follow the white blazes north as the trail shimmies along the edge below the summit. You’ll hit the side trail to White Rocks Cliffs in two miles, and a couple hundred yards farther you’ll see the spur trail to Blackstack Cliffs. Keep hiking the A.T. north beyond Bearwallow Gap to the rocky, precarious, and stunning route over Firescald Ridge. The Carolina Mountain Club sweat blood to move the A.T. over the most dramatic route possible along this ridge. After rock hopping your way across the crest, you can create a loop by taking the old A.T., which is now marked Bad Weather Trail, south back toward Bearwallow Gap, Blackstack Cliffs, and your car.Chestnut Knob, Va. As everyone knows, the A.T. runs north and south, but in Southwest Virginia, as the trail leaves the High Country of Mount Rogers, it cuts west toward Pearisburg and the West Virginia border. Here, it becomes a washboard trail, climbing up and over peaks like Walker Mountain and wrapping around Burke’s Garden, a farming community and valley known as “God’s Thumbprint,” because it’s surrounded by a 360-degree ridge, like someone squished their thumb into the mountains. Here lies what might be the most remote and least traveled section of the Appalachian Trail below the Mason Dixon. Road access is scarce, federally designated Wilderness areas are plentiful, and hikers are few and far between.“Just getting to the A.T. in this corner of Virginia is part of the adventure,” says Steve Yontz, trail maintainer for the Piedmont Appalachian Trail Hikers. “Honestly, the easiest way to access the A.T. at Burke’s Garden, is by hiking the A.T.”Make the effort, and you’ll be rewarded with constant views for nearly two miles on Chestnut Knob, a high elevation bald that was grazed by livestock until the late 1980s. On a clear day, you can see Mount Rogers 80 miles south, and even Grandfather Mountain farther into North Carolina. Go north from Chestnut Knob onto the crest of Garden Mountain, and you’ll get more views into pastoral Burke’s Garden below.Logistics: For a short trip, access the A.T. from Walker Gap and hike south a mile to Chestnut Knob and carry on south until the trail runs out of views. Retrace your steps and go across the gap north onto Garden Mountain for an extra leg-stretch. But if you truly want to experience the solitude and beauty that this stretch of the A.T. affords, start where the A.T. crosses Hwy 11 and climb Walker Mountain on your way to Chestnut Knob. You’ll put in big miles, but walk through old farmsteads, bag big views, and get to stay at Chestnut Knob shelter, which offers excellent star gazing thanks to the lack of ambient light.The Roller Coaster, Va.To say that any section of the Appalachian Trail in Northern Virginia is “undiscovered” is a bit of a stretch. “There’s no unpopular section of the trail in this day and age, but certain pieces aren’t necessarily in the limelight like the more well-known destinations,” says Bob Sickley, Mid-Atlantic trail resource manager for the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. The Roller Coaster, a 13.5-mile length of trail packed with non-stop ups and downs, is one of those under-appreciated stretches of trail. Consider it the “overshadowed little brother” to the A.T. inside nearby Shenandoah National Park. The Roller Coaster is the A.T.’s swan song in Virginia, offering the last memorable piece of trail before reaching the “psychological half-way point” at Harper’s Ferry, W.Va. Known for its constant elevation change, you’ll climb more than a dozen significant hills for a total of 5,000 feet of gain as you make your way toward West Virginia. The tread is rocky, and the climbing is short but steep without a switchback in sight thanks to an unusually narrow right of way for the trail.The Roller Coaster is a hell of a workout, and a great place to test your mettle if you’re just breaking into backpacking. You’ll also get to enjoy the primo view of Shenandoah Valley to the west from Raven Rock, aka Crescent Rock.Logistics: Pick up the A.T. at Ashby Gap, where the trail crosses Route 50 and head north towards the Blackburn Trail Center. Prepare yourself for nearly constant ups and downs with 200-500 feet of elevation for each hill. The section offers a no-brainer overnight opportunity, thanks to the Bears Den Trail Center, a popular hiker hostel located 100 yards off the trail roughly half way through the Roller Coaster.Bly Gap, Ga. and N.C. The 16-mile stretch of the A.T.  between Dick’s Creek Gap in Georgia and Deep Gap in North Carolina is in a sort of “no-man’s land,” far enough removed from hot spots like the Southern Terminus at Springer and the booming Nantahala Gorge. Hike the whole 16 miles, and you’ll cross the Georgia/North Carolina border at the halfway mark, but not a single road. In fact, the majority of the A.T. in this remote corner of the Appalachians hugs the western edge of the Southern Nantahala Wilderness Area, a relatively large but unknown federally designated Wilderness that covers the N.C./Ga. border. Access is so limited, that if you wait out the thru-hiker rush that comes in early spring, you’ll probably have the two trail shelters all to yourself.The climbing starts early as you leave Dick’s Creek Gap and yo-yo your way up and down ridges on your way to the state line. But consider the Georgia section of trail a warm up for the climb up Courthouse Bald in North Carolina, where the trail gains 1,500 feet via a series of relentless switchbacks. The views in Georgia are limited, but there’s a killer campsite and long-range view into the mountains of North Carolina at Bly Gap, 8.5 miles into the hike. From Muskrat Creek Shelter, take a .5-mile blue blaze to Ravenrock Ridge, a cliff with one of the most underrated views along the entire A.T. Other highlights include blooming rhodo in June. And did we mention the complete lack of roads?Logistics: Begin at Dick’s Creek Gap, where US 76 crosses the trail and head north. The climbing comes fast and builds as you move towards Deep Gap, N.C. where USFS 71 provides your “take out.” The forest road is gated during the winter. Two shelters sit on this portion of the trail, but their awkward location (Plumorchard Gap Shelter is just 4.5 miles into your hike) make it more practical to set up camp at Bly Gap just inside North Carolina. If you’re looking for a longer hike, the possibilities for side hikes through the Southern Nantahala Wilderness Area are plentiful. •last_img read more

SOUTHCOM Gifts Humanitarian Aid Warehouse to Honduras

first_imgBy Kay Valle/Diálogo August 16, 2018 In late June 2018, the U.S. government, through U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), donated a humanitarian aid warehouse to Honduras to store emergency supplies. SOUTHCOM’s Humanitarian Assistance Program presented the warehouse to the Permanent Contingency Commission of Honduras (COPECO, in Spanish), as part of a $1.1 million donation, June 22nd. The warehouse helps consolidate Honduras’s self-sufficiency in case of natural or man-made disasters. The donation also strengthens the Central American nation’s capacity for risk management. “This structure is crucial for COPECO, because it strengthens our response and preparation capabilities in emergencies, as it enables us to store more supplies to assist the population,” said Lisandro Rosales, national commissioned minister of COPECO. “I have no words to describe how beneficial this is for the country.” Immediate response The South Atlantic Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, assigned to SOUTHCOM’s area of operations in Latin America, was behind the design, awarding, and building of the warehouse. Standing 40 feet tall and about 119 feet wide, the depot was built in COPECO’s Tegucigalpa facilities. The project took about eight months to complete. With this brand-new warehouse, COPECO’s Tegucigalpa facilities now have two spaces to store basic supplies. “Now COPECO has about 35,000 meters of storage at a national level,” Rosales said. “In other words, it means we have the capability to keep ourselves stocked and be able to help immediately when required.” Each warehouse has the capacity to store basic supplies for about 500 families in the first 24 hours after an emergency, said Oscar Mencía, director of COPECO’s Preparation and Response division. The warehouses enable COPECO to provide support to people during the wet and dry seasons. “During the dry season [of 2014-2015], COPECO distributed 300,000 food sacks so that families affected by the drought could hold up for 15 days,” Mencía told Diálogo. “This was carried out with the WFP [World Food Programme], and supplies were distributed in the dry corridor departments [the northeast of the country].” The warehouses can also help neighboring countries when necessary. COPECO stored about 30,000 pounds of food, 2,000 hygiene kits, bottled water, and other supplies that were sent to Guatemala after the Fuego Volcano eruption of June 3rd. “This help is very important, as it strengthens not only COPECO, but also Honduras and COPECO’s operational part, the UHR [the Honduran Armed Forces Humanitarian Rescue Unit, in Spanish],” said Colonel Mario Alberto Matute Pacheco, commander of UHR-Honduras. “These warehouses make our work easier; we count on them to solve people’s needs.” Vulnerability zones COPECO requested help from the U.S. government to build the latest warehouse in 2014. So far, a total of five warehouses were built with U.S. support: two in the Francisco Morazán department and one each in Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios department; Danlí, El Paraíso department; and La Ceiba, Atlántida department. “The warehouses were requested [in these towns] because of the vulnerability and high population of the areas,” Mencía said. “For example, the warehouse in La Ceiba supplies four departments [Atlántida, Islas de la Bahía, Colón, and Gracias a Dios] that are more vulnerable to events such as floods or tropical storms.” According to its Global Climate Risk Index 2018, the German non-profit organization Germanwatch categorizes Honduras as one of the countries most affected by natural disasters in the last two decades. From 1997 to 2016, Honduras had 62 extreme climate events, with a death toll of more than 300,000 people and an economic loss of more than $500 million, the report said. COPECO’s National Plan for Integrated Risk Management 2014-2019 emphasizes the devastating effects of natural disasters—hurricanes, floods, droughts, and mudslides, among others—that impact the economy and curb development. According to the report, 27 percent of the country’s municipalities are vulnerable to disasters whose occurrences continue to increase each year. “Our country constantly needs donations like that of SOUTHCOM due to its vulnerability to natural or man-made disasters,” Col. Matute said. “This kind of donation increases the unit’s response to threats.” Thanks to SOUTHCOM’s warehouses, COPECO’s response capability will continue to increase, as two additional depots will be built in 2019, in the Valle and Lempira departments. In addition to the warehouses, the U.S. government designated about $15,000 for low-cost projects such as hygiene kits to be kept at warehouses. “We want to continue growing, so we can respond to the population,” Mencía said. “We will always need the support of SOUTHCOM for the departments that are in need.”last_img read more

Gov. Cuomo: State sees 37 straight days of infection rate below 1 percent

first_imgNEW YORK (WBNG) — Governor Andrew Cuomo stated New York has seen the 37th straight day of positive COVID-19 test result rates below one percent yesterday. The Governor also said there were 6 COVID related deaths in the state yesterday. In a statement on New York’s progress with the coronavirus, the Governor said 0.99 percent of yesterday’s test results in the state were reported as positive. center_img “Our numbers continue to reflect the work of New Yorkers, who ultimately flattened the curve,” Cuomo said.last_img read more

For doctors who think Trump fumbled the pandemic, the tight election is seen as an insult

first_img– Advertisement – In the spring, U.S. medical workers were heralded as heroes. But by the fall, the rhetoric had started to shift, with the public growing increasingly fatigued by the coronavirus pandemic and President Donald Trump accusing doctors of inflating Covid-19 death counts for money.With the death toll from the coronavirus continuing to tick up, many medical workers say they hoped for a landslide victory for Biden, who has said he’ll follow the advice of scientists if he’s wins the presidency.- Advertisement – Texas and Florida — where there have been more than 960,000 and 827,000 confirmed cases, respectively, so far — solidly went for Trump even though Democrats thought the outbreak gave them a fighting chance in some red states.“Many of us are now questioning whether we’re speaking into an echo chamber,” said Miami-based physician Dr. Krishna Komanduri. Miami-Dade County dealt a big blow to the Biden campaign in Florida and helped seal the state for Trump.The economy, and not the pandemic, was more of a priority for 70% of Trump voters, according to the NBC poll.- Advertisement – “Trump has insulted our integrity and allowed for more than seven months of chaos and excessive deaths to Covid,” said Dr. John Purakal, an emergency medicine physician based in North Carolina. “It’s so surprising to me,” he said. “But here we are.”A variety of polls indicate that the majority of Americans don’t approve of the administration’s management of the coronavirus. In July, just 32% of Americans said they approved of Trump’s pandemic strategy, according to The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. In August, 7 out of 10 Americans who responded to a CNN poll said the president’s response was embarrassing. NBC exits polls from Election Day and early voting, found that 51% of voters think U.S. efforts to contain the outbreak are going badly.Biden may still eke out a victory. But after the Trump administration undermined or contradicted its own medical experts on everything from wearing masks to reopening schools at the beginning of the outbreak, the tight race feels like a slap in the face for many physicians fighting the pandemic .- Advertisement – For doctors like Komanduri, the economy and the coronavirus are not separate issues. Successfully containing the virus will lead to fewer restrictions, which inevitably opens up the economy, he said.“It’s making me do a serious re-analysis of how I can make a difference,” added Komanduri, who’s the chief of transplantation and cellular therapy at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. “I went to bed Tuesday night feeling a real sense of helplessness and sadness.”Of course, not all health-care workers lean left and many remain major supporters of the Trump administration. A 2016 study found that 46% of doctors are Republicans. Things appear to have shifted in the past four years, however, with recent analyses indicating that more and more doctors are increasingly aligning themselves with the Democrats.For those who firmly sided with Democrats this year, the race has been too close for comfort. And that feels like a slight.As Purakal points out, hundreds of health-care workers have died from Covid-19, and countless others have been infected.“I really thought that our experiences in the trenches would impact people’s voting decisions,” added Dr. Avital O’Glasser, an associate professor and hospitalist at Oregon Health & Science University.Trump’s response to the virus reflects a disregard for scientific expertise, including his downplaying of the importance of masks. She thought Biden would win in a landslide, so the tight race is a real wake-up call, she said. Even if Biden ultimately wins, she’s been thinking about what she could do to communicate more effectively to people in the future.“Our country doesn’t have the science and math education that a lot of other countries have,” she said.Others say they are feeling exhausted after months fighting the coronavirus, and they were hoping for a clear-cut Biden victory to buoy their spirits.“I can’t help but feeling as a health-care worker that the nation really let us down … even if Biden does win,” added James Kerridge, a director of nursing practice based in Chicago. “All of the clapping doesn’t make up for the feeling of still being canon fodder for an inept administration.”Dr. George Alba, a pulmonologist based in the Boston area, said the election leaves him feeling dismayed. He’s had to live separately from his family for weeks at a time to keep them safe, and he’s been working long hours treating Covid-19 patients.“We felt like we had the nation’s support until the coronavirus became political and the administration started eroding confidence in scientists,” he said. “The sentiment around supporting health-care workers only lasted as long as it was politically convenient.”Others doctors have been doing a lot of soul-searching about what their patients might be going through, and how they can better relate to them.Dr. Laolu Fayanju, a family medicine doctor based in Ohio, treats patients in so-called Rust Belt cities like Youngstown.He’s heard from a lot of his patients that they’ve been having a difficult time during the pandemic and are feeling lonely and isolated. Others are concerned about their job prospects, and felt emboldened by Trump’s promises to bring back manufacturing jobs.He’s recognizing that many of those patients handed Trump a win in Ohio.“I drive through this former General Motors auto plant on my way to work,” he said. “It feels like a mausoleum, a symbolic representation of what the region is going through.”last_img read more

Island estate so peaceful you can fall asleep sitting up

first_img How COVID-19 is changing buyer wish lists An internal lift makes it easy to access all four levels.The considered four level design allows for open planing living on the ground floor, four spacious bedrooms on the first floor and a grand luxury master above. The basement doubles as a party zone with a bar and games lounge set up with pin ball machines, a darts board and billiard table while a five-hole putting green is wisely positioned alongside the water. “My grand son adores playing putt putt, but there are usually more balls in the water than on the green,” Mrs Jordan said. The alfresco entertaining area is tucked away out of the weather.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoThe home has been the ideal entertainer over the years, hosting extended family and friends for special occasions.“The house is big enough to entertain everybody without everybody getting under your feet,” Mrs Jordan said. The alfresco area with built-in barbecue is a favoured space in any conditions. “It doesn’t matter if it’s rail, hail or shine, you are so protected,” said Mrs Jordan. “It is the best space to sit for breakfast, lunch or dinner. No wind or rain comes in.“I love having people over for breakfast these days and that’s the best place for it.” Sit in the sun and watch the boats cruise by.Having moved to Australia from the UK in 1974, Mr Jordan built homes in Brisbane before moving to the Gold Coast to create their own piece of paradise. In a nod to his Irish roots, the words ‘Caoga A Sé’ feature on the front of the home, which translates from Gaelic to the number ‘56’. MORE: Top end buyers splash cash on main river The outlook is spectacular from 56 Knightsbridge Parade East, Sovereign Islands.Each morning when they wake, Muriel and Bill Jordan have a treasured ritual. They raise the blinds in the master suite and enjoy a cup of tea as they take in the wide expanse of water lapping the shores of Brown Island and South Stradbroke Island. “We can sit and watch the sun come up before we get out of bed,” Mrs Jordan said.“We watch the boats going past but no one can see us.”center_img You can watch the sun rise each morning from the master suite.Peaceful and private are the words Mrs Jordan chooses to describe life in the estate, which has been home for the past seven years.“We can be sitting out the back with a cup of coffee and cake in the sun and half the time Bill will fall asleep it’s that quiet,” she said. “The water can make you feel really relaxed.” Virtual southern buyers bypass border closure The pool runs alongside the Broadwater.The Jordans hope to remain on Sovereign Island where security offers peace of mind.“We don’t want to move really, but the house it too big for us now,” Mrs Jordan said.“Sovereign Island really is unique and the people are lovely. The security is also great. We feel very safe here.”Hanan Cawley, of Harcourts Coastal – Broadbeach, is taking offers over $5 million.last_img read more

Bulldogs Fall To Spartans In Middle School Hoops

first_imgThe Batesville Middle School 7th Grade team lost a heartbreaker to Connersville on Monday night, 35 to 33.The Bulldogs were plagued early by foul troubles, which also came back to bite them late in the 4th quarter, with 2 players fouling out for Batesville. The Bulldogs left everything on the floor against a tough Spartan team, but in the end it wasn’t enough to come away with a victory. Batesville was led by Mason Barker with 7 points, RJ Powell, Calvin Sherwood and Trey Peters each scoring 6 points, Bristol Davies with 4 points, and Austin Cornn and Ethan Brewer each adding 2 points.With this loss, the 7th grade Bulldogs fall to 2-3 on the season. Batesville will be back in action Tuesday night at home when they take on the North Decatur Chargers at 5:30.Score By Quarter:Batesville- 1st-6, 2nd-8, 3rd-10, 4th-9, Total-33Connersville- 1st-6, 2nd-10, 3rd-4, 4th-15, Total-35Individual Shooting:Mason Barker- 2FG-2, 3FG-1, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-7; Calvin Sherwood- 2FG-3, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-6; RJ Powell- 2FG-2, 3FG-0, FT-2 for 2, Total Points-6; Bristol Davies- 2FG-2, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 1, Total Points-4; Austin Cornn- 2FG-1, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-2; Damon Grieshop- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0; Pros Moorman- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0; Trey Peters- 2FG-0, 3FG-2, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-6; Matthew Meyer- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0; Jaden Peetz- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0;Nathan Villani- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0; Alex Siefert- 2FG-0, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0; and Ethan Brewer- 2 FG-1, 3FG-0, FT-0 for 0, Total Points-0.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Luke Williams.The Spartans win the 8th Grade contest 54-33.Score by quarters.1st Bville 12, Cville 162nd Bville 21, Cville 253rd Bville 23, Cville 42Final Bville 33, Cville 54Batesville Team Stats:14/28 2pt FG0/16 3pt FG5/9 FTBatesville Individual Stats:Dempsy Bohman 10 pts, 5 rbs, 1 ast, 1 stl, 3 blocks.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Chris Bradford.last_img read more

Student Athletes

first_imgI know you have read several blogs about the academic achievements of local athletes.  Two-time state champ, Curtis Eckstein, was one of the top graduates recently at Oldenburg Academy.  Mary  & Sarah Poltrack were top students at BHS as well as record breakers in track and cross county.  If you read the Herald Tribune’s tribute to Batesville, East Central, and Oldenburg Academy’s top students, you will notice that a lot of them not only excelled in the classroom but on the athletic field as well.For many years Batesville High School, a 4-star scholastic school system, has had more Academic All-State athletes per student population than any other high school in the state of Indiana.  Too many media outlets want to jump on athletes who get in trouble.  It is much nicer to write about those who quietly go about excelling in everything they do.last_img read more

Wood-Mizer seeks additional Batesville property

first_imgBatesville, In.— Batesville Area Planning Commission has recommended approval by city council of rezoning a 10 acre plot near Wood-Mizer. Wood-Mizer has quickly occupied the 79,000 square-foot facility that was built in 2015 and is looking for long-term expansion options.The land is being purchased from the Leila M. Kelly Special Trust.Wood-Mizer is a worldwide company based in Indiana with branch offices in 5 continents and 100 distributors. The company produces products to increase profitability and promote sustainability in the timber industry.The sale of the land has not closed.last_img read more

$1,000 to win IMCA Modified feature at 34 Raceway on The Fourth

first_imgWEST BURLINGTON, Iowa – Top prize for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds is $1,000 this Saturday, July 4 at 34 Raceway.Roberts Tire Center makes the payout possible. The holiday show is a qualifying event for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot.Also on the card for Young House Family Services Night are IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods, as well as 305 sprint cars, midgets and 4-cylinders.Fireworks follow the race program.Pit gates open at 4:30 p.m., the grandstand opens at 5 p.m. and hot laps are at 6:15 p.m. with racing to follow.Spectator admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $7 for students and free for kids 10 and under. Pit passes are $25.last_img read more