Storms hit; students take cover

first_imgStudents took cover in the lowest level of buildings for about an hour and a half Tuesday morning after the University issued a campus-wide alert notifying the community of a tornado threat. The University informed students via e-mail, phone calls, text messages and overhead announcements to take cover. The messages called the threat “imminent.” No tornado occurred, but winds reached more than 70 mph, the South Bend Tribune reported. University spokesman Dennis Brown said there was no damage on campus besides “a couple branches [down] here and there.” Brown said the branches did not hit any buildings and he was not aware of any trees that came down. The University sent out the first alert around 9:10 a.m. and asked everyone on campus to go to the lowest level of a building. A second message was sent out at 10:26 a.m. reporting that the warning had been extended. The University gave the “all clear” for students to return to normal activity at 10:46 a.m., Brown said. Brown said the “redundancy” of the alerts — through text messages, phone calls, e-mail, the University website and the public address system — was effective in getting the word out to students, faculty and staff. The public address system, which was activated last spring, was a “very effective tool” for making an emergency announcement, Brown said. “I think for the most part the combination of tools that we used to alert the campus worked well,” he said. “It was a disruption this morning, but I think most people were able to cope and go to the lowest level and wait it out.”last_img read more

Woman who posted video of herself feeding black bear may face jail time

first_imgBody of missing Asheville hiker Chad Seger found Woman missing in Zion National Park for 12 days is found alive After Seger’s body was located, his family gathered near the search area to thank first responders. “We found him yesterday. It wasn’t what we wanted, but our minds are at ease,” Chad’s sister Chelsea told ABC 13 News. “I just wanted to thank Team 57. They found him. They pulled him out and they did their job.”  A California woman who went missing in Zion National Park while on vacation has been found alive after she was lost in the park for 12 days. Holly Courtier, 38, injured her head on a tree while exploring the park and became disoriented, her family said. She survived by staying close to water until rescuers could located and reach her. When rescuers did eventually track down Courtier, she was so dehydrated that she could take only one or two steps before collapsing. The body of missing hiker Chad Seger, of Asheville, was found Tuesday afternoon in the Shining Rock Wilderness Area of Pisgah National Forest, search and rescue officials said. The body was found in an off-trail area near the Art Loeb Trail. The cause of Seger’s death has not yet been determined. “The overwhelming desire to have a close encounter with a black bear is strangely more powerful than common sense,” Sevier County Wildlife Sgt. David Saxton told CNN. “Many people intentionally feed bears with little regard for the dire consequences to the bears and humans they leave behind.”center_img A woman who filmed herself intentionally feeding a black bear in Gatlinburg, Tennessee and posted the video to Tik Tok, may face up to six months in jail, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency said. The 21-year-old woman from Virginia has been charged with illegally feeding a bear, a Class B Misdemeanor. Woman who posted video of herself feeding black bear may face jail time “She was very disoriented… and thankfully ended up near a water source—a riverbed,” Kailey Chambers, Courtier’s daughter, said in a statement. “She thought her best chance of survival was to stay next to a water source.”  Photo courtesy of Getty Images – by MattCudalast_img read more