Band restructures Irish Guard

first_imgKevin Song | The Observer The Irish Guard performs alongside the Band of the Fighting Irish in the Sept. 8, 2012, game against Purdue. The Guard has been restructured to include band members only, eliminating the height requirement of 6’2”.Pemberton said he was concerned that the changes could affect the history and tradition of the Guard, which has existed since 1949, according to the band website.“I would hope that the significance of the Irish Guard within the band would become more prominent as a result of these changes, as that was their intended effect, but I can’t help but feel that [the Guard’s] significance on campus and as a symbol of the strength, integrity and athleticism of Notre Dame and of the Fighting Irish will slowly diminish as a result of these changes,” Pemberton said. “Regarding its legacy, this may be the end of a long line of Guardsmen who, for 65 years, have passed down the stories, techniques and respect for the uniform that originated with John Fyfe.”“While there will still be kilted members of the band to lead it onto the field and perhaps perform Damsha Bua, our victory clog, much of the lore and pageantry that has become a large part of the pregame ritual on fall Saturdays will be lost,” he said. “There are a lot of little things that go on that spectators wouldn’t necessary notice, but have become very significant for Guardsmen and their friends and families.“For example, just as the band is setting up for [the] concert on the steps and before we march in our ranks onto Bond Quad to meet them, we take a moment to halt in the middle of God Quad and salute Mary on top of the Golden Dome. It’s the little things that make marching out every week so special to all of us and to all of the Guard alumni — many of whom come back to greet us every week and treat us as their own kids.”The Irish Guard began as a group of students who played bagpipes with the band, according to the band website. Dye said drawing members from current band members would move the group closer to its historical tradition.“[We are] going back to where it started, where [Irish Guard members] were musicians in the band,” he said. “That was continued for a couple of decades and then it strayed from there. It does have musical roots, and we are going back to our roots.”Dye said no other eligibility requirements would be changed other than the elimination of a specific height requirement.“Next year’s Guard will all be very tall in stature, but we don’t want to put a number on a person,” he said. “So next year’s Guard will probably be visibly just as tall, but we … don’t want to ever number a person because a lot of it depends on their poise and how they stand and their posture and we want to make sure that there is a uniformity in look — that we maintain that tradition — but we don’t want to put a number on it.”Dye said the new process will allow for more leadership opportunities within the band, a large group that he said has proportionally fewer leadership roles than other campus clubs. He said changing the policies to require one year of service in the band as a performer or manager will allow potential Guard members to demonstrate their commitment to the group.“We’re looking for the qualities of the student,” Dye said. “We’re looking for a student that has fabulous service to the band and the community, great attendance and citizenship in the band — someone that has proven themselves in the organization for a minimum of one year, preferably longer. With the current system, there really isn’t that time to assess their leadership qualities and participation in the band.”Dye said he hopes making the Irish Guard a more leadership-focused position within the band will give the position added prestige.“We hope that [new Irish Guard members] are model band students and model Notre Dame students, so that when you say ‘Irish Guard,’ and you’re interviewing for job, that this is the kind of person you want for a manager or a CEO of a company,” he said.Associate News Editor Jack Rooney contributed to this report.Tags: history, Irish Guard, Kenneth Dye, marching band, Notre Dame, tradition The Irish Guard, the kilted group of marchers who meet a six-foot-two height requirement and perform with the Band of the Fighting Irish, has undergone significant changes for the upcoming football season, Guard captain and junior Andrew Pemberton said.“The Irish Guard will continue to be a section within the band, but will now be reserved for members who demonstrate at least one year of service and leadership as a musician or manager,” Pemberton said in an email. “The new plan likens the Irish Guard to drum majors or band president, with the goal of making membership in the Irish Guard a one-year honorary position.”Dr. Kenneth Dye, director of bands, confirmed the change in the selection process for new Guard members. He said the band staff invited the 2013 Guard members to audition for the 2014 football season but chose to select an entirely new group from current band members based on the idea that serving on the Guard will now be a one- to two-year commitment.“We interviewed the [previous Guard members] who decided to apply and then we told them recently that we were going to start with a new group,” Dye said. “… The idea is not to have four-year Irish Guard members or three-year Irish Guard members.“We want to limit it to something that is done as a special leadership opportunity that is perhaps one or two years in duration. [The 2013] group has already served one or two years, and we thought that that was fair.”Dye said he and the band staff, with the approval of the Office of Student Affairs, believe restricting membership in the Irish Guard to current band members and managers will increase their level of commitment to the specialized group.“We’re trying to elevate the responsibility of the Guard so that they exemplify the best qualities of a Notre Dame student,” he said. “… If we pick from the membership of the [2013] Guard rather than from an auditioning membership at the beginning of the fall, then we know what their record and habits and citizenship are, and it gives us a stronger pool of applicants and participants to really put the best people that we have in front of the band.”last_img read more

NAMING OF DONEGAL’S LATEST RNLI LIFEBOAT – PICTURE SPECIAL

first_imgThe RNLI Buncrana team at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the first Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive Wassonat the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive Wassonat the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive Wassonat the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonJimmy Tyrrell, Honorary Life Govenor speaking at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonMartyn Smith and his wife Rachel at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the First Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonSomeof the crowd at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonJohn McCarter Lifeboat Operations Manager speaking at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the first Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonJohn McCarter Lifeboat Operations Manager speaking at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the first Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonFr Francis Bradley, Parish Priest of Buncrana and Reverend Judi McGaffin, Church of Ireland Rector dedicating the newly names lifeboat at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonSome of the crowd at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the first Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonJoan Browne speaking at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive Wasson Jimmy Tyrrell, Honorary Life Govenor with John McCarter Lough Swilly, RNLI, Lifeboat Operations Manager naming the first Shannon Class lifeboat, 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonGeorge O’Haygen, Amy McCarter, Mark Barnett, Coxswain, Barry Stevenson, Eamon Manon and Gregrory McDaid, crew at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the First Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonLiam McGee, John McCarter, Jimmy Tyrrell, Pat Heaney, Joan Browne and Reverend Judi McGaffin at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonLiam McGee, John McCarter, Pat Heaney, and Kate Heaney at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive Wasson The first Irish Shannon Class lifeboat the 13-08 Derek Bullivant in action at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June after the naming ceremony. Photo – Clive Wassonat the naming ceremony and service of dedication of the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonJoan Browne, Liam McGee, Pat Heaney, JOhn McCarter, Thomas the Miller and Kate Heaney at the naming ceremony and service of dedication of first the Shannon Class lifeboat 13-08 Derek Bullivant at Lough Swilly Lifeboat Station on Saturday the 25th of June. Photo – Clive WassonNAMING OF DONEGAL’S LATEST RNLI LIFEBOAT – PICTURE SPECIAL was last modified: June 27th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Australian Boxer Dwight Ritchie Dies in Sparring Accident

first_img Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. australiaboxerdead First Published: November 10, 2019, 11:00 AM IST Sydney: Australia’s boxing community was in shock Sunday after middleweight Dwight Ritchie collapsed and died aged just 27, reportedly while sparring.Sydney’s Daily Telegraph said he took a body shot on Saturday, walked back to his corner and collapsed. He could not be revived. It said he was sparring in Melbourne with Michael Zerefa, who is preparing for a rematch with Jeff Horn, a former WBO welterweight champion.Ritchie’s promoter Jake Ellis confirmed the news on Facebook.”It is with great sadness and shock to announce that the fighting cowboy Dwight Ritchie sadly passed away today doing what he loved,” he said.”As Dwight’s promoter and friend it’s unbearable to accept the tragic news that’s just surfaced.”Richie, nicknamed “The Fighting Cowboy”, held a 19-2 record.He last fought in August, losing to Tim Tszyu by a unanimous decision for the IBF Australasian super welterweight title.”I am truly saddened by the passing of Dwight Richie,” Tszyu said on Instagram.”Only fighters understand the bond shared between them, especially those who shared a ring together. Rest In Peace to a true champion.”Ritchie’s death comes less than a month after American boxer Patrick Day died after suffering a serious brain injury during his knockout defeat to Charles Conwell in Chicago.He was the third boxer to die from injuries sustained in the ring this year.Argentina’s Hugo Santillan died in July following a bout in San Nicolas, just north of Buenos Aires. His death came just two days after Russian fighter Maxim Dadashev died from brain injuries sustained in a fight in Maryland. last_img read more