Sargent with 9 Ks and No BBs in Shutout Win

first_img This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text Hancock County Court News Nov. 3 thorugh Dec. 11 – January 22, 2015 House fire in Winter Harbor – October 27, 2014 admin Bio SULLIVAN — The Tigers claimed their second win of the season as righthander Lona Sargent struck out nine and walked nobody in a 5-0 win over the Lady Minutemen of Stearns on Wednesday, April 29.At the plate, she slammed a three-run homer to go with a solo homer by Ashley Pennartz and a double by Kaitlyn Hodgkins. For more sports stories, pick up a copy of The Ellsworth American. State budget vs. job creation – January 22, 2015 Latest posts by admin (see all) Latest Postslast_img read more

How the SU Soccer Stadium grass is designed to outperform the elements

first_imgOptimal irrigation occurs between 2 and 7 a.m., said Guy Fipps, a professor in Texas A&M’s department of biological and agricultural engineering who specializes in irrigation technology, water quality and water management.Fipps said many systems he analyzes see three to four times the water amount applied than actually needed. He said fungi and dry spots occur because of improperly designed systems, where sprinkler heads are not properly spaced. The idea is to have head-to-head coverage, Fipps said, which creates overlap to improve field uniformity.The SU grounds crew now waters the field four times per week, at 20 minutes per zone. The water cycle varies depending on rainfall, with an increase over the last few weeks of September, when Syracuse experienced record-breaking heat. The dampness of the grass determines how the ball moves.“We want to play it faster, we want to move the ball side-to-side faster,” junior forward Hugo Delhommelle said. “If the grass is pretty dry, it’s not as fast as when the grass is wet.”Schools such as Syracuse stick to real grass rather than artificial surfaces, because, as Delhommelle and several other SU teammates said blankly, playing on grass is “more natural.” Turf increases the rate of injury, Fipps said, and it produces higher bounces. Other schools invest in turf because it’s generally easier to maintain. Irrigation alone costs between $5,000 and $10,000 per year.“I just think the ball moves better,” Syracuse junior forward Adnan Bakalovic said. “It’s just a sport that plays on grass. You see pro teams overseas play on grass. More MLS teams are going to grass as well. I just think it’s a part of the game to play on grass.”Josh Shub-Seltzer | Staff PhotographerIt hasn’t always been a part of the game for every Syracuse player. Bakalovic, a Utica native, played mainly on artificial turf while with the Empire Revolution Academy. Junior defender Kamal Miller grew up further north in Ontario, Canada. There, Miller never played on grass.He remembers grass being seen as a commodity. His club team, Vaughan FC, made the League One finals two years in a row. Both finals games were hosted in BMO Field, a grass surface where Toronto FC plays its MLS matches.Now, Miller plays on grass every day. The climate in Syracuse isn’t much different from that of Ontario, but the grounds crew is more precise. After the game, Buffum and the crew do their rounds and replace the divots. A water cycle is laid down and the process repeats. One trim per day and twice on gameday.Sometimes, though, Miller can’t resist a third cut.“There’s been times when I mow it one way and then the other and I just have to mow it want one more way because you want that perfectly cut nap,” he said. “It gets obsessive.” Comments Published on October 2, 2017 at 10:06 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+center_img A three-pronged, hand-held pitchfork dug deep into the pitch. Dave Buffum picked up the divot then reached into a white bucket. Using a metal shovel, he sprinkled top dressing into the wounded area before pressing the grass down. While Syracuse and Cornell broke for halftime last month, around 8 p.m., Buffum continued his long day of work, which begins daily at 10:30 a.m.Buffum leads a four-person crew at SU, where two members work each soccer game. But on that night, he had extra help. There was a youth soccer game during halftime. Baldwinsville and Oswego grade school students herded around one ball, unknowingly assisting Buffum’s crew. The young players stomped, patching up the injured areas the grounds crew couldn’t reach. It was a resurfacing of sorts.“It’s important to get the divots right back in so they can bite back in,” Jim Miller, the manager of grounds at Syracuse, said. “That’s one of the key components giving the field good longevity over the season.”Buffum’s attention to detail underscores the importance of maintaining a lush playing surface for the Syracuse men’s and women’s soccer teams. He works year-round to ensure the field recovers from any kind of high traffic or stress, like Division I athletes ripping it up for 90 minutes a night. They also want to prove the sod is drought and snow tolerant. In a calendar year, Syracuse’s grounds crews dump around 30 tons of sand and spray roughly 100,000 gallons of water to ensure vigor.Thanks to the intense care, Syracuse plays on an all-natural surface like 10 of its 11 conference opponents.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThis season, the hurdle was 80- and 90-degree days in September, when there were 12 games at SU Soccer Stadium. Last year, it was a drought. By the playoffs, it may be snow flurries. SU moved an NCAA Tournament game to Onondaga Community College due to snow last year. Regardless, keeping the playing surface on the campus of one of the snowiest colleges in the U.S. in a season as unpredictable as fall isn’t easy.“What you don’t hope for is snow,” Miller quipped.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorBased on 30-year averages, September is the third-rainiest month in Syracuse at 3.68 inches. Brian Donegan, a meteorologist at Weather.com, said it didn’t rain enough to replenish the water in the soil in 2016. This year, record heat and humidity brought new challenges.Three weeks ago, a period of humidity prompted pythium, a destructive parasite that can “wipe out a field in three days.” To monitor the performance and the playing quality, an SU grounds crew member walks the entirety of the field about four times per week. Patches can produce irregular bounces.“You ask any young man or young woman — they’d play on good grass (instead of artificial turf),” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “It can be a better surface of which to move the ball around. It’s easier and better on the body.”Since the SU men’s and women’s soccer teams began this season in late August, temperatures have been erratic. By mid-season, temps can drop to about 50 degrees, which slows down the growth and recuperating ability of the grass. The slowdown can force managers to properly overseed or overwater to ensure extra strength.SU focuses on keeping an extensive root system, which digs deeper into the soil, helping in drought situations such as 2016. To care for the grass, field managers use Signature Blend fertilizer. In the spring the fertilizer contains a pre-emergent to prevent weed germination. In the fall, the fertilizer is a mix of nitrogen in potassium with a higher percentage of iron, keeping the grass green without pushing too much growth.They mow the 225 by 360-foot field twice on game day, going opposite directions each time to create the signature grid on the pitch, and once every other day with a 72-inch wide reel mower. To produce designs on the field, the grounds crew uses push brooms to dictate which way the grass lays. By putting the grass blades in opposition, the crew created a design featuring a block “S” for the Louisville game in mid-September.last_img read more

Janus scoring when it counts

first_imgWhen the University of Wisconsin men’s soccer team faced a setback this weekend in a loss to Michigan that effectively eliminated the Badgers from the Big Ten regular season title contention, senior forward Nick Janus wasn’t the problem.Janus tallied yet another goal this weekend against Michigan, providing a spark for the Badger team before they finally fell to the Wolverines. The goal was Janus’ seventh of the year, making him the leading goal scorer for Wisconsin.Janus, a senior from Deer Park, Ill., has not been anything short of astounding this year for the Badgers despite a slow start. Janus didn’t make a mark on the score sheet until four games in when he scored his first goal of the year against South Florida on Sept. 12. Since that game, Janus has scored seven goals in 10 games. Along with two assists, Janus leads the team with 16 overall points.Janus has exceeded even the high expectation set for him when head coach John Trask brought him into the program at Wisconsin.“[Nick] adds elements that any good soccer team needs,” Trask said. “With outstanding physical tools and good ideas, he should complement the other attacking players we have well.”His seven goals this season make up just more than a quarter of the Badgers’ 27 goals of the season, making Janus one of the most pivotal members of the Wisconsin offense.Janus’ impressive goal-scoring ability has landed him on the top of the charts in the Big Ten. Janus is currently third in both goals scored and points per game in the conference behind only Northwestern’s Joey Calistri and Michigan State’s Tim Kreutz.Janus is also not only an effective striker but an efficient one. Despite being one of the conference’s top scorers, he has only taken the eighth most shots in the conference. Seven other players have more shots than Janus while he has been able to outscore all of them except Calistri and Kreutz.“The coaches have been talking about not squandering goal-scoring opportunities this year,” Janus said. “I think we have been doing a really good job of being efficient offensively this year.”Janus has chosen the right moments to score this year too — something Wisconsin has grown accustomed to especially at home. His ability to step up for the Badgers in close situations, and score three game winners, has landed him on the list, tied with five other Big Ten players, for most game-winning goals.Janus not only is scoring goals, but is leading the team by scoring goals. One of John Trask’s four captains for the season, he leads by example when the Badgers are in a bind.“Janus is a great leader out there,” Trask said. “His control of the field and understanding of the game make him a powerful weapon on the field.”Out of his seven goals this season, five of them have been the Badgers’ first goal of the game, while three of them ended up being the Badgers’ only goal in the game. When Wisconsin fell behind Penn State 1-0 early in their matchup earlier this month, Janus was able to put away the equalizer and give life to the restless Badgers.A similar situation occurred just this weekend against Michigan. After going down 1-0 to the Wolverines, Janus helped Wisconsin fight back and tallied a quick goal just 11 minutes after Michigan’s first blow.Against Marquette, Janus was able to redirect a cross from last year’s leading goal scorer Chris Prince into the net for the one and only goal of the game as Wisconsin defeated their in-state rivals for the first time in five years.Trask clearly understood he could trust Janus with the game on the line as he sent Janus to the dot to take a penalty kick that would end up sealing Wisconsin’s victory against Drake the next week.With five games remaining, it’s evident that all of Wisconsin scoring records of the early 1980s remain safe, but that doesn’t detract from what Janus has been able to accomplish this year. If he is able to reach 10 goals, he will tie the record for the Badgers in the last 10 years and, even more importantly, he will be part of an effort by Wisconsin to make a late season push to the NCAA tournament.The prospects are looking a bit more likely as Wisconsin continues to climb in the RPI and polls, but the future is still uncertain.If the Badgers do make the tournament, their goal from the onset of the year, it will be their first NCAA tournament appearance since they won the championship in 1995. And leading Wisconsin’s offensive charge will be their top goal scorer, Nick Janus.last_img read more