Granit Xhaka hits back at Patrice Evra’s ‘bulls***’ after Arsenal’s defeat at Sheffield United

first_imgMousset scored the only goal of the game at Bramall Lane (Picture: Getty)Evra famously called Arsene Wenger’s players ‘babies’ after Manchester United beat Arsenal to reach the Champions League final back in 2009 – and the former left-back repeated his comments on Monday evening.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I used to call them “my babies” ten years ago, and they are still when I look at them and think they are “my babies” and that’s the truth – I’m not being disrespectful when I say that,’ Evra said.‘They look pretty, but they don’t look like a winning team. They like playing good football, but I was so happy to play against them, because I knew I was going to win.’ Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 22 Oct 2019 9:28 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link4kShares Emery reacts to Arsenal’s 1-0 loss to Sheffield UnitedTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 6:38FullscreenEmery reacts to Arsenal’s 1-0 loss to Sheffield Unitedhttps://metro.co.uk/video/emery-reacts-arsenals-1-0-loss-sheffield-united-2032306/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Though Arsenal have lost four of their last seven away matches against newly-promoted teams, Xhaka played down claims that the side have a mentality issue when playing on the road.‘We have to stop talking about [the mental side of the game] and bulls*** like this,’ the Arsenal captain said.‘I’m sorry to say that, but for me it’s the same whether you play at home or away.‘You have to win and show big character and not look for the same excuse.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAsked specifically about Evra’s comments, Xhaka replied: ‘A lot of people speak too much.‘I have a lot of respect for him because he was a great player, but you have to be careful what you say.‘He knows what these situations well, but it’s not only him. A lot of people speak a lot of bulls*** and it’s always the same.‘For me it’s strange because they [ex-footballers] have been in the same situation as us – maybe it was sometimes good, sometimes not so good.‘But like I said, if you speak bulls*** like this every weekend, then what they say doesn’t get respected.’MORE: Ian Wright reacts to Nicolas Pepe missing sitter and fumes at Unai Emery after Arsenal defeat Granit Xhaka hits back at Patrice Evra’s ‘bulls***’ after Arsenal’s defeat at Sheffield Unitedcenter_img Comment Granit Xhaka responded to Patrice Evra calling Arsenal ‘babies’ after their defeat to Sheffield United (Picture: Getty/Sky Sports)Granit Xhaka has hit back at Patrice Evra’s ‘bulls***’ claims after the Frenchman referred to Arsenal players as ‘my babies’ in the wake of their 1-0 defeat at Sheffield United.Lys Mousset’s scrappy strike on the half-hour mark gave the Blades all three points at Bramall Lane as the Gunners fluffed their chance to move up to third in the Premier League table.The result means Arsenal have failed to record a win in their last four matches away from home and Unai Emery’s unusual team selection was criticised by Ian Wright, among others.Speaking on Sky Sports’ Monday Night Football, Evra accused Arsenal of being mentally weak after yet another inconsistent start to a league campaign.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisementlast_img read more

Interest rates to rise despite RBA

first_imgExperts predict interest rate rises despite the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) decision. Photo: Joel Carrett.THE majority of experts in a recent survey believe financiers will increase their loan rates independent of the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA).Ninety per cent of the 38 experts and economists surveyed by comparison website finder.com.au expect banks to up their loan rates.This is despite the Reserve Bank opting this week to keep the cash rate on hold at 1.5 per cent.When the RBA do eventually move on the cash rate, 68 per cent of those surveyed expect them to rise, with the majority believing the shift won’t come until August or November this year.REA Group chief economist Nerida Conisbee said banks and other financial institutions were expected to continue to increase rates partly because of increased wholesale costs and partly because of APRA pressures.“They will be pretty cautious about raising them but they will raise them independent of the Reserve Bank.”Finder.com.au insights manager at finder.com.au, Graham Cooke, said future hikes mean first home buyers need to be careful.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020“With banks likely to lift mortgage rates out-of-cycle, the onus is on first home buyers to factor in potential rate rises to their budgets,” Mr Cooke said.“Generally, mortgage holders should account for two to three per cent on top of their current repayments to avoid rate shock.”Mr Cooke said there was an expectation the gap between the number of first homebuyer and non-first homebuyer loans will continue to widen.“This trend indicates that the market is running away from first-time buyers, as many young couples may be forced to look to the city outskirts to purchase their first home,” he said.Independent economist Saul Eslake said economic data released over the past month would have given the RBA confidence to keep rates on hold in March.“And comments by Phil Lowe over the past month clearly indicate that he has little appetite for further reductions in interest rates, in the absence of a significant negative economic shock,” Mr Eslake said.last_img read more

School reform facing hurdles

first_img“This plan is not baked yet. We’re still in the process of working our way through this plan,” Brewer said. “Everybody’s got to take a deep breath here.” Corrective actions And perhaps offering a glimpse of what he might use for leverage, Brewer said the district is required to develop a restructuring plan under federal No Child Left Behind regulations. “Nobody can get around the fact that we’re under corrective actions because of NCLB and the state,” Brewer said. “That is a fact.” But the teachers union is strongly opposed to elements of Brewer’s plan that include merit pay for teachers, incentive pay for principals and scripted teaching at middle and high schools. And in meetings on the plan, teachers have been urging Brewer to provide resources so they can carry out individualized reform efforts – rather than pulling them into a district of low-performing schools. The dispute puts Brewer in a politically sensitive position, trying to show results in his first year at the district’s helm. Meanwhile, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is in his third year at the city’s helm and facing his own pressure to perform, union leaders are jockeying for a February election and a new school board is trying to make its own mark. In such a politically charged environment – with each of the key players driven by personal gain – broad agreements on LAUSD reform are difficult to attain. “What you’re seeing is political safeguarding, quantifying results and players thinking about taking something with them for the next political office,” said Jaime Regalado, director of the Edmund G. “Pat” Brown Institute of Public Affairs at California State University, Los Angeles. “They’re going to fritter away money on the parts and not on the whole. You’re going to have piecemeal approaches that will be more expensive in the long run than a unified approach.” And while New York City schools announced an agreement this month on a merit-pay system for teachers at the lowest-performing schools, experts note that the LAUSD has different challenges. “Politically, in New York, there hasn’t been over the decades the union playing as heavy a money contribution in the elections of school boards,” Chan said. “Therefore, school board members in New York can very likely be less beholden to unions than in L.A.” While education leaders note that Brewer has charisma, they also say the former Navy admiral is politically inexperienced and lacks a solid senior staff. They note that he initially said he wanted to get rid of ineffective teachers, but a year later now says professional development is the answer. But Brewer vows that he is committed to moving forward in a district that has had its hopes raised often in the past, only to see them dashed. “There’s so much cynicism in L.A. and one of the challenges I have is to build confidence in our ability to change,” Brewer said. Officials wary Still, community leaders who in the past have enthusiastically embraced proposals aimed at increasing achievement and reducing the dropout rate are wary. And education leaders say teachers union contract conditions stifle the ability of the LAUSD to get to the root of the problems of low achievement and high dropout rates. “The elephant in the room is UTLA,” said Bob Scott, chairman of the Valley Industry & Commerce Association. “One of the things that’s been proven is the schools function better when out from under the yoke of the California Ed(ucation) Code and also when they can be relieved of some of the restrictions of the union contracts.” Villaraigosa’s own reform effort is an example of the union’s influence. While the mayor first proposed that he control the entire district, he failed to win union backing. Eventually, he brokered a backroom deal with the UTLA and ended up with legislation that gave him partial control. But that legislation was struck down by the courts and Villaraigosa is left now to work on a plan to manage two groups of low-performing schools. And while the plans by Brewer and the mayor are heavily modeled on successful charter practices, charters don’t have to contend with union contracts. Charter schools also have the freedom to implement practices they believe will allow them to reach goals – including merit pay and the ability to remove ineffective teachers. “They’re unwilling to adopt all the ingredients of charter schools and `Charter Lite’ is not reform,” Chan said. Chan said the current LAUSD reform proposals need to define work hours, teacher evaluations, grievances and due process. She said that when she was writing the charter for her Vaughn Next Century Learning Center, officials reviewed all of the LAUSD’s codes and rules – and decided the answer was to scrap all of them. “That is the premise. We pushed it to the limit,” Chan said. Instead, the charter focused on getting more dollars to its school site and improving working conditions. Not a single teacher filed a grievance or complaint with UTLA. Opting out of the UTLA Five years after the school opened in 1993, its teachers opted out of the UTLA. Steve Barr, president of Green Dot Public Schools, has successfully kept the UTLA out of his schools and recently won the right to convert schools near Locke High into charters. His teachers are members of the California Teachers Association, the UTLA’s umbrella organization, and they operate under a contract that he negotiated the terms for. Regalado said the growing disillusionment and series of reform failures may be pushing the LAUSD toward a tipping point that could force a breakup. “What people are now talking about – either directly or around the edges – is the current structure is too large and ungovernable,” Regalado said. “It’s far too large to be able to control with far too many decision-makers to appease.” For the latest school news, go to www.insidesocal.com/education. naush.boghossian@dailynews.com, 818-713-3722160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Just two weeks after announcing an ambitious effort to reform Los Angeles Unified middle schools, Superintendent David Brewer III finds his plan already foundering amid fierce opposition from the politically powerful teachers union. Brewer, who proposed creating a special district of 44 low-performing schools, already has had to eliminate 10 of the sites and still faces opposition from teachers over the remaining schools. Only one San Fernando Valley school remains on the list. And new rumblings have surfaced that union leaders and teachers in the proposed schools intend to kill the plan entirely. “This plan of his – which was created in a vacuum by noneducators in a think-tank environment – is bad for students, it’s bad for education, and we are going to oppose this with all of our will,” said A.J. Duffy, president of United Teachers Los Angeles. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.“If he tries to bring this plan about, we will organize actively against it.” The discord between the union and new superintendent is raising questions about whether reforms that challenge long-held collective-bargaining agreements can be implemented in the beleaguered school district. And education observers said they believe that if Brewer’s plan does survive, it will likely be a diluted version of the original in order to get the approval of the UTLA. “Reform at LAUSD has been consistently negotiated away,” charter school pioneer Yvonne Chan said. “I’ve been around for 15 years and if you say reform, are you willing to take on those major challenges – including the union contract and giving schools financial autonomy?” But Brewer on Wednesday defended his plan and said it is not yet complete and will eventually reflect input from all stakeholders when it is presented to the school board later this month. last_img

India-Pakistan contests bigger than Ashes, says Inzamam-ul-Haq

first_imgIndia-Pakistan cricket is more exciting and far bigger than the Ashes because of the sheer number of people who come in to cheer, says former Pakistan captain Inzamam-ul-Haq.Inzamam and former India skipper Sourav Ganguly were speaking at the Salaam Cricket Conclave held at Hotel Maurya in New Delhi. Both legends walked down memory lane to take their fans through some endearing moments of their rivalry. (Also read: India have a 99 per cent chance of winning World T20, says Virender Sehwag at Salaam Cricket) While Ganguly revealed he asked Inzamam for bats during his playing days, Inzy recalled how Ganguly would send food to the Pakistani team in Kolkata. The two men, divided by boundaries and cricketing rivarly, were united by a conclave that is bound to touch millions of hearts in two nations.”India-Pakistan contests are better than Ashes. The crowd following was immense and there were great players who competed for their countries,” said Inzaman, who also praised Virender Sehwag lavishly.Sehwag, who blasted a triple hundred against Pakistan in Inzamam’s hometown Multan and smashed another double hundred against them in Test cricket, was a nemesis for Pakistani bowlers for years. Inzaman said it was impossible to set a field agaisnt Sehwag. (India on track for World T20, says Dhoni after Asia Cup win)”Imagine Sehwag batting on the first day of a Test match and I had four or five fielders near the ropes. It was difficult to stop him and it was difficult to captain against him,” said Inzamam at Aaj Tak’s Salaam Cricket Conclave. “Sehwag made me doubt my captaincy, because he would not only score at breathtaking speed, he would also score big.”advertisementGanguly, who led India on a historic tour of Pakistan in 2004, said it was one of the best tours of his cricket career. India and Pakistan were playing a bilateral series for the first time in 15 years, and Ganguly said that the atmosphere there was electric.”That was one of the best tours of my cricket career. I have rarely seen hospitality like that on and off the field. The people were great, the facilities and food was excellent. I want India to make more such tours. It’s also great for batsmen because they have some of the flattest pitches in the world,” Ganguly said.International teams have not toured Pakistan since the attack on the Sri Lankan team bus in 2009. Bilateral cricketing ties between India and Pakistan have also suffered since the 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai. Pakistan did visit India for a short limited-overs tour in 2012, but a more recent tour of the Middle East (Pakistan’s new ‘home venue’) was cancelled by the BCCI.last_img read more