Wizard at circuits, physics

first_imgOnce a top physics student who aspired to study black holes, Donhee Ham turned his sights from the huge to the small, from a study of the spacious skies above to tiny quantum wires, transistors, and integrated circuits.Ham, who was named Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics in July, designs silicon chips containing millions of transistors for radios and computers, but his unique skills come out in projects that blend circuit-building with physics for unconventional applications and new scientific pursuits. Ham built the world’s smallest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system by controlling atomic nucleic motions on a silicon chip, for example. The system, 1,200 times lighter than a commercial instrument, can be used as a handheld biomolecule sensor for disease screening, oil detection, and quantum computing.“He’s using his skill as an electrical engineer to go into other fields and really make an impact,” said Robert Westervelt, Mallinckrodt Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics.In announcing Ham’s promotion, Cherry Murray, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, said Ham’s work at Harvard has helped to boost the School’s presence in electrical engineering. She hailed his “nearly encyclopedic understanding of physics and solid-state circuits,” which, she said, has led to creative and innovative applications in diverse fields such as biotechnology and medicine.In creating the mini-NMR system, Ham and graduate student Nan Sun rethought how NMR works. A magnet is essential to NMR. Because a larger magnet yields a stronger signal, most NMR machines use bulky magnets. Sun and Ham took an opposite approach, using a magnet only the size of a Ping-Pong ball and building a high-performing radio-frequency silicon chip that can retrieve the signal weakened by a small magnet. The result is a 0.2 kilogram NMR system that can be held in the palm of the hand. It is not only 1,200 times lighter than a conventional NMR system, but also 150 times more sensitive.Another project in Ham’s lab seeks to observe and engineer a state called “plasmonic resonance” in a metal where many electrons vibrate together as a group. The state has long been observed in optics, but at a very high rate of vibration. Ham’s pursuit is observing plasmonic resonance at a slower vibration rate — hundreds of billions of cycles per second — which falls in the electronics domain. The work, conceived by doctoral student Xiaofeng Li and carried out by Li and graduate student William Andress, envisions enabling plasmonic resonance in the electronics domain by exploiting the unique properties of tiny metals called “quantum wires.”If researchers can create waves, Ham said, they will be able to learn more about electron-electron interactions in quantum wires. Practically, the study could lead to the development of new types of resonators and transistors, Ham said, which could suggest a new avenue for electronics.Ham got his start in physics in college in South Korea, winning several prizes and graduating summa cum laude from Seoul National University in 1996, where he also won the Valedictorian Prize and the Physics Gold Medal. After a year and a half of mandatory service in the Korean Army, he went to the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) for his graduate work.He began working in astrophysics under Barry Barish, Caltech’s Linde Professor of Physics. Though Ham loved physics, during his first year his career interest shifted to a more practical field. After considering chucking it all for law or business, he settled on electrical engineering as an area where he could put physics to use. His doctoral work examined the statistical physics of circuits and earned him the Wilts Prize, given for the best electrical engineering thesis at Caltech.After Ham earned his Ph.D. in 2002, he came to Harvard as an assistant professor. He became associate professor in 2006, and Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences in 2007.“I owe my career to my teacher [Barish] and students,” said Ham. “Barry taught me how to do and enjoy science and how to help others. When I was quitting physics and not knowing what to do next, Barry generously went out of his way to support me. He said it was an investment in young people.”Top electrical engineering students gravitated to Harvard to work with Ham.“Not only did Xiaofeng Li, International Physics Olympiad gold medalist and two-time top ranker of the U.S. Intercollegiate Physics Competition, devise the plasmonics work with his superb science,” Ham said, “but he solved in two weeks a circuit noise problem that avoided solution for 40 years, revealing a surprising, beautiful connection between classical circuits and quantum electrodynamics. Xiaofeng is an incredibly deep and clear thinker who has an inside track to truth.”Discussing another gifted contributor, Ham said that Andress, 2004 Hoopes Prize winner, “created tiny electromagnetic and plasmonic devices I could not think of.”On Nan, who is a top graduate from Tsinghua University and a two-time Harvard Teaching Award winner, Ham said: “Nan should have received all the recognition I’ve received for the NMR work, for he singlehandedly and brilliantly built a series of ever-shrinking NMR systems in just one year, with the highest intellectual and technical virtuosity and scientific breadth.”“I am blessed to work with students with the highest quality of minds,” Ham said.Ham’s physics background, Westervelt said, makes him a good collaborator with physicists. For example, Westervelt has found that when he talks with chip designers, he finds that they understand the project, but not the physics behind it. In talking with Ham, Westervelt added, it’s apparent he understands not only the engineering but its underlying science, making him a good sounding board for ideas.“He’s a very creative guy who knows his science as well as engineering. He not only understands an idea, he can deliver the goods,” Westervelt said.last_img read more

Keeping Patients Safer with Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics

first_img Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 2:53Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -2:53 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsen (Main), selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. The low-latency, high performance private cloud foundation integrates Dell EMC PowerEdge servers and Dell EMC PowerScale storage. The core of the system is a Hadoop cluster residing on Dell EMC PowerEdge R540 and R640 servers running demanding AI workloads including intensive machine learning and statistical algorithms. It also includes Kubernetes and machine learning workloads running on PowerEdge 740 servers with NVIDIA® GPUs. According to David, “Our partnership with Dell Technologies allows us to take advantage of the full breadth and depth of their compute, storage, networking and security solutions. Dell Technologies offers best-of-breed solutions in all these categories.”The team also uses VMware® vCenter™ and VMware vSphere™ Enterprise Plus to manage virtualized server resources and optimize server performance, along with Dell EMC OpenManage Enterprise and iDRAC.   The PowerScale OneFS distributed file system provides management for the storage infrastructure. This combination helps the team easily deploy, monitor and manage system updates and add new technologies. “OpenManage Enterprise offers a complete view of all the servers in our infrastructure,” David explains. “It’s an easy-to-use, centralized management tool that gives us the transparency to detect and address issues as soon as they occur. Through OpenManage Enterprise, we can ensure that our PowerEdge infrastructure is at the optimal firmware patch level. We maintain control not just over the operating system security patches, but over server security overall.”The ease of management also allowed Medacist to onboard more customers with minimal headcount increase. As David reports, “As we grew from 600 to over 2,000 clients, we were able to minimize growth in management overhead while delivering the scalability and performance our increased workloads required thanks to our Dell Technologies infrastructure.”  The complete solution has also reduced data processing lag time from 24 hours to just five minutes. It also provides 99.99% uptime, which has saved Medacist millions of dollars by upholding client service level agreements (SLAs). Delivering better accuracy with shorter processing timesMedacist specializes in drug-diversion analytics, a specialized healthcare service for identifying unusual patterns that could indicate possible abuse. The company’s Genesis healthcare data platform applies data analytics — including artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) — to vast amounts of data from a variety of sources throughout a drug’s lifecycle.Reliable, scalable and high-performing compute and storage solutions are mission-critical for Medacist. When the company needed to integrate multiple storage and analytics systems onto a shared data plane, David J. Brzozowski, Jr., Chief Technology Officer at Medacist, turned to Dell Technologies. By partnering with Dell Technologies for their infrastructure modernization project in support of the Genesis healthcare data platform, Medacist is now able to deliver new insights to more clients, faster than ever before.last_img read more

Notre Dame staff supports Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger drive

first_imgAcross the country, Hunger Action month spans throughout September, educating the nation about widespread hunger in the United States and fighting to help those in need. Many members of Notre Dame’s community have come together the past nine years to conduct the food drive, Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger, each September to raise money and awareness for the same cause, with proceeds going towards two groups: the People Gotta Eat initiative, under United Way of St. Joseph County, and the Food Bank of Northern Indiana. The drive seeking donations will run from September 9 to 29. Anne Kolaczyk, chair of the event, noted one in four kids in northern Indiana go to bed hungry each night. The funds raised for the Food Bank of Northern Indiana will go towards a specific “backpack program,” she said.“[The backpack program] gives kids in need a backpack of food to take home with them over the weekend, so that they have food to eat over the weekend,” Kolaczyk said. Kolaczyk explained the drive is largely run by Notre Dame staff, rather than students. “This is not one of the sanctioned charities that Notre Dame collects money for,” Kolaczyk said. “This is basically just kind of a grassroots effort to ease the hunger situation in the community.”She said the drive is a group effort among many departments, coordinated by Kolaczyk, to collect money for the two initiatives. However, there are some individuals who work apart from their departments to raise money for the initiatives. “There are many people across campus whose departments are not doing anything [with the drive] because they can’t spare the time or the manpower, but they still donate,” Kolaczyk said. She explained that, while some departments go all out and try to raise money, there are many individuals on campus who donate directly to the initiative websites rather than departmental fundraising. Kolaczyk, who works in OIT, explained how her department raises funds for the event. “I plan different things. Somebody donated some tickets to [a home football game this season], so I offered them for sale and somebody bought them,” she said. “I was able to take that money and it will go into the pot that goes to the food drive.”She said the OIT department runs a pot-luck pizza, salad and desert lunch to collect money for the drive. “We usually raise about 400 dollars that way,” Kolaczyk said. The finance division also participates in the Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger challenge. Mark Zeese, who works in the controller’s office in the finance division, said the finance division divides everyone into teams for a “loose change challenge.”“In essence, everybody throws in their loose change or dollar bills … that goes towards their team totals,” Zeese said. “As kind of an incentive or reward, our employees are allowed to wear blue jeans on Friday, which is kind of special because we obviously dress professional during the school year.”Zeese said when people notice the employees wearing blue jeans, it serves as a reminder that September is Hunger Awareness month.  Among the hundred or so employees, the teams collectively raise $1000 to $1300 each year for Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger, Zeese said. Kolaczyk said monetary donations to food bank can be more beneficial to those in need, rather than buying canned goods and other food items.  “One dollar that’s donated can provide up to eight or nine meals for someone just because the food bank and the food pantries have so much buying power that if we went out and we bought a jar of spaghetti sauce and some pasta we might spend three dollars, where with three dollars [they] can do so much more because they can buy things at a discount,” Kolaczyk said. “That’s why we mainly ask for money not for food.”There will also be a collection for Fighting Irish Fighting Hunger at the game day Mass on Sunday following the New Mexico game. Tags: Food Bank of Northern Indiana, food drive, Hunger action month, people gotta eatlast_img read more

Think Ahead

first_imgHome gardeners must fight insects and diseases to keep their vegetable plants healthy and productive. Diseases are harder to identify because, unlike bugs, you can’t easily see a pathogen, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little.“Insects can be seen on plants, but diseases are a little mysterious,” said Little, a plant pathologist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “You can’t just look at the plant and know what’s going on.”Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in, she said.The secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them, according to Little.“If you wait until after you see the disease, it’s too late,” she said. “It’s all about prevention because diseases can increase very rapidly once they start.”To fight diseases in the home garden, Little offers home gardeners these prevention tips.Plant in an open, sunny location with good drainage and plenty of air circulation.Choose disease-resistant and/or Southern-adapted varieties, if available.Start with healthy seeds and transplants.Plant summer crops, such as tomatoes and cucurbits, as early as possible.Rotate different crops within the garden each year if possible.Give plants plenty of space for good air movement. Trellis tomatoes and cucumbers.Limit the frequency of overhead irrigation to keep foliage dry.Use drip irrigation if possible.To help keep plants healthy, improve soil conditions with organic matter.Adjust pH and soil fertility based on a soil test.Remove old crop debris at the end of the season.Following these practices will help home gardeners avoid most disease problems. If persistent problems occur, contact your local UGA Extension office for a correct diagnosis of the problem and a recommendation on how to treat it.last_img read more

Highlights of the Week

first_imgCSV Southern Ocean Stays with McDermott ROVOP Expands in Europe with New Office and Team Member Subsea World News has put together a recap of the most interesting articles from the previous week (May 20 – May 26). Reach Subsea Vessel to Support Titanic Survey Expeditioncenter_img Sonardyne Snaps Up EIVA DCN Diving Charters Another Solstad Vessellast_img

Newcastle announce profit

first_imgNewcastle have recorded a profit for the second successive year, the club has revealed. The Magpies have released financial figures for the year ending June 2012 which show that the club made a profit after player amortisation of £1.4million. That is significantly down on the previous year’s level of £32.6million, although that was due largely to the £35million sale of striker Andy Carroll to Liverpool. Newcastle have also re-entered the list of the world’s top 20 revenue-generating clubs after increasing turnover by 5.4 per cent to £93.3million. That figure includes a rise of 14.6 per cent in television income as a result of their fifth-placed Barclays Premier League finish, a figure which is set to be boosted further by the bumper new broadcasting deal. However, while operating costs have remained steady at £21.6million, operating profit fell from £13.3million to £7.5million, and the club’s wage bill rose by 20 per cent to £64.1million as a result of the addition of the likes of Yohan Cabaye, Sylvain Marveaux, Davide Santon, Papiss Cisse and the now departed Demba Ba to Alan Pardew’s squad. That represents an increase in the wages-to-turnover ratio of 8.1 per cent to 68.7 per cent. Although attendances at St James’ Park rose to an average of 49,936 during the period – an increase of 2,190 on the previous year – ticket revenue dropped by seven per cent because of a series of pricing initiatives. Commercial revenue too was down by 12.7 per cent, although the figures do not include the Magpies’ new partnership with Wonga, which they say “represents a significant increase on the club’s previous commercial agreements”. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Formula 1 esports teams confirmed ahead of second season

first_imgIt’s been revealed that nine of the 10 world championship teams will be competing in the second season of the Formula 1 Esports Series. The only team that hasn’t entered the virtual racing scene is Ferrari.The Formula 1 Esports Series will see online drivers compete on F1 2017, the game played in the FIA Formula 1 World Championship, in hopes to qualifying for a place in the inaugural Pro Draft in July. The Pro Draft will see the following teams select the drivers they wish to represent them in the second half of the season. The teams involved are as follows: Mercedes AMG Petronas Motorsport, Red Bull Racing, Hype Energy eForce India, Williams F1 Esports Team, Renault Sport, Team Vitality, Haas F1 Esports Team, McLaren, Toro Rosso, and Alfa Romeo Sauber F1 Team.There will be four qualifying events for players to enter the drafting stage, kicking off on April 13th. The first event will see drivers behind the wheel of Valtteri Bottas’ Mercedes in Shanghai, with the 10 fastest players on PS4, Xbox One, and PC progressing to a live-streamed final. From there, the top three on each platform will cement their place in the Pro Draft.Once teams have chosen their drivers, they will compete in the second half of the season where a $200,000 (£142,418) prize pool is up for grabs. There will be three live events to decide the World Champion, much like Brendon Leigh who won the very first season in Abu Dhabi in 2017.Just last month it was announced that DHL is the first official partner of the Formula 1 Esports Series, acting as a natural expansion of the logistics company and Formula 1’s longstanding relationship.Esports Insider says: It’s good to see (almost) all of the official F1 teams wanting to be represented in esports. The Pro Draft seems like it will be just as exciting and intense as the competition itself, which is great news for the series.last_img read more