Classes Helps Child Care Providers Get into and Stay in the Business

first_imgThe Micro Business Development Program is offering a free8 week course for people interested in starting a childcare business orexpanding their existing business. The course begins on Wednesday, May17, 2004, at 6:30 pm at our office in The Maltex Building, 431 PineStreet, Burlington, VT.Childcare has proved a pivotal industry in Vermont over the last twodecades by providing a substantial income for households where bothparents want to work. Many providers go into the field because of theircare and skills with children. The class aims to assist those providersexcel in the field by enabling them to effectively deal with businessissues.The course is based on a curriculum developed by the Marion EwingKauffman Foundation, a reputable organization devoted toentrepreneurship and education. It addresses two key components of achildcare business: the business plan and the parent handbook. Thebusiness plan helps the provider develop strong business sense while theparent handbook presents tools to effectively communicate the business tothe parents receiving care.Anyone interested in learning more about the class, or the servicesoffered by Micro Business (a program in its fifteenth year of assistinglow to moderate income Vermonters in starting and running a businesseffectively) is invited to call Gillian Franks at 860 1417.last_img read more

Rival Indigenous bidder for the Trans Mountain pipeline cautiously welcomed

first_imgThe Canadian PressThe British Columbia director for a First Nations consortium planning to buy a majority stake in the Trans Mountain pipeline says the emergence of a rival Alberta Indigenous bidder raises concerns about weakening his group’s all-inclusive bid.But Shane Gottfriedson of Project Reconciliation says he welcomes the interest and competition from Iron Coalition, an Alberta-based organization co-chaired by Chief Tony Alexis of Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation, which is to announce details of its intended bid today.Iron Coalition says it is the only Alberta group mandated by the Assembly of Treaty Chiefs to pursue the stake and is inviting all First Nations and Metis communities in the province to join in.Gottfriedson, a former chief of the Tk’Emlups te Secwepemc First Nation and a former B.C. regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations, says Project Reconciliation’s business model is more “inclusive” because it wants to enlist Indigenous groups from B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan in its $6.8-billion bid for a 51 per cent stake in the pipeline project.Finance Minister Bill Morneau has said the federal government won’t negotiate the sale of the pipeline it bought for $4.5 billion last summer until after construction of its proposed expansion is “de-risked,” without saying what that means.The CBC reported he met with Iron Coalition in March.The government is to make a final decision on whether the delayed expansion can proceed by June 18.“For me, it’s good for them (Iron Coalition). I think we knew going in it would be a competitive field to be involved in,” said Gottfriedson.“At the end of the day, the No. 1 goal is to get the product to the market.”news@aptn.calast_img read more