More bad news for apartment approvals

first_imgBuilding approvals numbers were lower across the country this month.The unit building boom has run it’s course according to figures released by the ABS today.ABS analysis showed national seasonally-adjusted building approval numbers for May 2017 fell by 5.6 per cent.And the result for Queensland’s building sector was also disappointing with approvals down 21.6 per cent compared to the same quarter in 2016. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoHousing Industry Association principal economist, Tim Reardon, said the downturn had become entrenched this year.“The downward trend for new home approvals has now been locked in for about six months,” he said.While the May 2017 seasonally-adjusted measure for Australian houses dropped just 0.6 per cent, other housing, such as apartments, dropped 12.1 per cent for the month.“It is the multi-unit sector of the industry that has slowed more quickly than detached homes,” Mr Reardon said.During the three months to May 2017, national multi-unit approvals fell by 27.8 per cent when compared with the same period in 2016.“It is important to note that this dramatic slowdown in multi-units is off the back of the super-cycle of apartments that commenced in 2015,” Mr Reardon said.last_img read more

Cole handed FA fine

first_img But he was charged by the FA, which confirmed he had been fined with a short statement on its website. “Following an Independent Regulatory Commission hearing today, Carlton Cole has been fined £20,000 after he admitted breaching FA Rules in relation to social media,” it read. “The West Ham United player, who was also severely warned as to his future conduct, admitted posting a comment on his Twitter account which was abusive and/or insulting and/or improper and/or brought the game into disrepute, in breach of FA Rule E3.” Cole, who is currently recovering from a hamstring injury that forced him off during the game at Tottenham, will look at Rio Ferdinand as an example of how to avoid future misdeameanours. The QPR defender was handed a three-game ban earlier this season for a second FA charge over social media activities – with the former England captain not contesting the suspension despite labelling the severity of the decision as ‘crazy’. Press Association West Ham striker Carlton Cole has been hit with a £20,000 Football Association fine after admitting breaching social media rules.center_img The 31-year-old, who was also “severely warned” as to his future conduct, had been charged following an exchange with a Tottenham supporter after West Ham’s 2-2 draw at White Hart Lane. Cole has well over 100,000 Twitter followers and was responding to a message from the Spurs supporter Stuart Hardy that said: “Hi @CarltonCole1 when your own team-mates don’t kick the ball out when you’re lying injured for 2 mins, you think it’s time to call it a day?”, Cole replied: “F off you c***” before later deleting the tweet. last_img read more

Syracuse hosts Notre Dame in pivotal conference matchup, still looking for first ACC win

first_img Published on March 26, 2014 at 11:39 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse A year after finishing his career as an elite defender on Syracuse’s back line, Brian Megill already sees things differently. Since leaving SU, he’s gained a new outlook on the game, and it’s one he wishes he had while still playing with the Orange. So a day after SU dropped its third Atlantic Coast Conference game in as many tries on Sunday, Megill emailed some of his former teammates. He’s worked through the same kind of rut the team is currently stuck in, and offered a perspective it badly needs. “I wanted to tell them that bad runs happen, but have to be stopped by the team as a whole,” Megill said. “For guys like the seniors, there isn’t a lot of time left and I lived that last year.”No. 9 Syracuse (4-3, 0-3 ACC) hosts No. 7 Notre Dame (4-2, 2-0) in the Carrier Dome at noon on Saturday, and it could be the last chance for the Orange to salvage a season that is slipping away. For SU’s senior class — notably goalie Dominic Lamolinara, attack Derek Maltz, midfielder Billy Ward and long-stick midfielder Matt Harris — the date with the Fighting Irish, and the games proceeding it, present an ultimatum of sorts. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange has six games left on its regular-season schedule. And if it doesn’t end its season-long skid soon, it won’t play into the ACC or NCAA tournament, and a handful of careers will be cut short. “We’re not happy,” SU head coach John Desko said. “We have to get better, we’re better than halfway through the season, and we have to get better as a group in almost all aspects.”The hours following SU’s 21-7 loss to Duke last Saturday were solemn. No more than 30 minutes after the final whistle, players were watching film — of them being outclassed by the Blue Devils — on their laptops in the team van. When they got on the plane, the laughing that follows road wins was absent. So was the light talking that normally follows a road loss. NCAA rules forced Desko to give the team a day off Monday, and he still hadn’t seen his players when he addressed the media before practice Tuesday afternoon. But they had seen one another. “We had a team meeting, and it was one of the more brutal team meetings I’ve ever been a part of,” Lamolinara said. “For the first time ever I think our hearts were questioned, where we are and what we want.“I mean, with the way it looked on Sunday I think it’s warranted to question where some people’s hearts are.”As has been the story all season, the next game isn’t any easier than the last. Notre Dame doubled up No. 8 Virginia 18-9 on March 16 — Syracuse lost to the Cavaliers by five goals earlier in the season — and edged No. 5 North Carolina 11-10 on March 1. UND also has the second best faceoff specialist in the country in senior Liam O’Connor, who is winning draws at a 68.5 percent clip. And in its last game against Ohio State, sophomore attack Matt Kavanagh scored a program record-tying seven goals. Syracuse, on the other hand, is still cycling six players through a faceoff rotation winning draws just 37 percent of the time. O’Connor gets to improve his torrid start against a limping group, and if he gets the Fighting Irish possession more times than not, Kavanagh will have a chance to put a dent in the scoreboard. There’s no time for Syracuse to breathe after its worst loss of the season. Just another tough test, six games and the growing possibility that that will be it.“The thought of having just six more games is mind boggling,” Lamolinara said. “I used to have that many games in a weekend at some tournaments. Looking at that has opened up our eyes to what we have in front of us.“We haven’t lost anything yet and our goals are still there.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Wenger anniversary underlines slipping standards

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp Beginning of end? However, Arsenal fans’ frustration at Wenger’s stubborn approach finally bubbled over — it had been simmering for several years — when Leicester, stealing his old formula of buying cheap foreign talent, won the title last season.“Wenger is a very pragmatic man and I would love to see him throw his economic principles out of the window for one season and see what happened,” Keown said.Forced to endure verbal abuse and calls for his resignation, Wenger has been battered like never before over the past 18 months.And failure again this season to win either the Premier League or Champions League could spell the end of one of English football’s most celebrated figures — and with it the closing of an era.  Golden period If pasta, grilled chicken and broccoli were the ingredients of Wenger’s recipe for success, he was just as ground-breaking in the cutthroat world of the transfer market.Establishing a scouting network far superior to any of his rivals, Wenger fused Arsenal’s battle-hardened defence with an influx of astute cut-price signings. London, United Kingdom | AFP | Arsene Wenger memorably announced his arrival as a revolutionary force in England by banning his players from eating sweets, but the Arsenal manager’s reign has turned increasingly sour as he marks the 20th anniversary of his appointment.Arguably the most significant agent of change in the Premier League era, the 66-year-old’s achievements in revitalising both Arsenal and English football will rightly be celebrated in this milestone week for the urbane Frenchman.Yet when Wenger makes the drive from his home in the exclusive north London suburb of Totteridge to the Emirates Stadium for Saturday’s clash with Chelsea it would be understandable if he pondered how he finds himself in danger of being viewed with the same disdain that greeted his hiring two decades ago.In an era when even the most unglamourous Premier League club can use the riches from lucrative television contracts to lure high-profile foreign coaches and players, it’s hard to recall just how insular the Premier League was when Wenger left Japan’s Nagoya Grampus Eight to join Arsenal in 1996.Few overseas stars plied their trade in England at the time and tabloid headlines sneered “Arsene who?” while Wenger’s professorial looks were easy fodder for doubting fans and some cynical members of Arsenal’s old-school squad.Given Wenger had no Premier League experience and first came to Arsenal vice-chairman David Dein’s attention not for his managerial acumen but for his skill at charades during a dinner party, it was a significant gamble by both parties to let the Frenchman loose on English football.It proved a masterstroke and, after coming third in the Premier League in Wenger’s first season, Arsenal never finished outside the top two for the next eight years.Overhauling Arsenal’s dietary and fitness regimes and introducing sports science and data analysis with remarkable results, Wenger was feted as the most innovative manager of his generation.“Nutrition was a big deal for Arsene. The dietician had a slogan, ‘Chew to win’, meaning he wanted us to chew our food for longer,” former Arsenal defender Martin Keown said.“We started feeling superhuman during games, fitter and stronger than ever.” Patrick Vieira, Thierry Henry, Nicolas Anelka and Emmanuel Petit arrived as unknowns and left as superstars, while Wenger crucially managed to coax extraordinary feats from Dutch forward Dennis Bergkamp.During that golden period, Arsenal won three Premier League titles and four FA Cups with a smooth-passing style that raised standards in a league previously more enamoured of brute force.In 2003-04, Arsenal’s “Invincibles” went undefeated in the league and two years later they almost conquered Europe before narrowly losing the Champions League final against Barcelona.But Wenger’s success was a double-edged sword as his peers closed the gap by pilfering his philosophy at a time when Arsenal were burdened by the financial restrictions from their move to the Emirates.Confronted by the new-found wealth of Chelsea and Manchester City, whose owners were attracted by the riches in the league Wenger played such a role in reshaping, Arsenal never finished higher than third between 2005-06 and 2014-15 while losing disillusioned stars like Cesc Fabregas and Robin van Persie.Wenger was never shy of pointing out how much other clubs were spending, while emphasising how Arsenal remained competitive and pleasing on the eye on a more restrained budget.last_img read more