In Your Neighbourhood

first_img Veteran club Caribbean Classic warmed up for the semi-final of the Jamaica Domino Council Association (JDCA) League with a comprehensive 300-247 win over Exceptional International last Sunday. It was Classic’s ninth win of the season. Caribbean Classic will clash tomorrow with arch-rivals, Spit Fyah – a team formed a couple of seasons ago – at Caymanas Park Limited. Spit Fyah will come out firing, but Classic have the ammunition to nullify any attack from their opponents. Spit Fyah also warmed up for the clash by beating Spring Village 300-281 in their matchup. In other games, Eradication cut down Small Axe 300-259; Ten To Ten outlasted Highlight Strikers 300-298 in a countdown; Memory Lane stopped Naggo Head 300-283; Giants surprised Waterhouse United 300-291; Right Stuff beat Tamarind Tree 300-261; and Feluchie stopped Sour Sop Tree 300-261. The JDCA had this to say: “We are appealing to all domino enthusiasts, players, spectators and supporters to come out and support this thrilling encounter as we strive to bring the sport of domino to a higher level.” Passagefort on a roll Defending champions Passagefort United reeled off their seventh consecutive win as they turned back the challenge of a spirited Westmeade Rising Stars 250-242 in the latest round of the South East St Catherine Constituency Domino League – sponsored by Member of Parliament Colin Fagan, in Westmeade last Sunday. The win left Passagefort cruising at the top with maximum 28 points, 10 clear of Waterford (18), which beat Garveymeade 250-226; and Ken’s Wildflower (18), which defeated Cumberland 250-242. Garveymeade (17 points) have dropped to fourth place, while Cumberland lie fifth with 17 points, Westmeade sixth with 11 points and Portsmouth, in last position on two points. The competition takes a break tomorrow and returns on Sunday, September 27. INSPORTS Portmore Primary football, netball in October Schools in Portmore are gearing up for the 2015 season of the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) Portmore Primary football and netball leagues. The deadline for entries to be submitted for both competitions is September 30. The football League will commence on Thursday, October 8, at the Portsmouth Primary football field, with an opening ceremony and two matches. Defending champions Portsmouth will play Independence City at 10 a.m. and Waterford take on Bridgeport Primary at 12 p.m. Chubby will sponsor the League, to the tune of $100,000 and also donate products. The Netball League will commence at Kensington Primary School at 10 a.m., with an opening ceremony and two matches. Host school, Kensington Primary, will play Belmont Park at 10 a.m., while defending champions Portsmouth will tackle Waterford at noon. Member of Parliament for East Central St Catherine, Arnaldo Brown, will cover the expenses for the preliminary round of the league. Portsmouth Primary football rally Portsmouth Primary School, in association with the Institute of Sports, once again stage their one-day football rally on Friday, October 2, on the school grounds. Registration is at 9 a.m. and matches are slated to begin at 9:30 a.m. Entry fee is $3,000 and must be paid by Thursday, October 1. The main aim of the competition is to promote and develop football within the schools and build the confidence of young players while providing the experience needed for upcoming competitions. The competition is open to both primary and preparatory schools in Jamaica. The event was last contested in 2013, where McAuley Primary from Spanish Town won. They defeated the host school 3-2. JBA to host all-Island ‘Baseball Roll-out’ The Jamaica Baseball Association (JBA), headed by President Uel Gordon, will be embarking on an all-island project to spread the game of baseball through the length and breadth of Jamaica, through an initiative called ‘Baseball Roll-out’. Errol Matthias, the coordinator of the project, said this initiative will commence in Portmore on Saturday, October 17, at 10 a.m., tentatively set for the Urban Development Corporation playing field, which is located across from the Portmore Mall. There about 230 children – aged nine-12 – from primary and preparatory schools will be taught the dynamics of the game. The theme for the project is ‘pitch it, hit it, field it, catch it’. On a broader scale, the JBA will target players from nine years to 19 years in primary, prep, junior high and high schools across the island. BH football finals at Barbican today The divisional finals of the KSAFA/Western Sports Business House competition will be played at Barbican today, with KO champions Petrojam taking on the unbeaten GraceKennedy, starting at 3 p.m., and the unbeaten Peak Bottling vs Sagicor at 1 p.m. Last Saturday, the Lenworth Hyde-coached Petrojam clipped defending champions Metrodade 1-0 in the semi-final, courtesy of a late goal from captain Jothan Watson, to advance. Grace Kennedy defeated Scotiabank 2-0 in the other semi-final, with goals from Karat HoSang and Michael Spence in the 54th and 89th minutes, respectively. In division two semi-finals, Peak Bottling beat NCB 3-2 on penalty kicks after both played to a 4-4 tie in regulation and extra time, while Sagicor clipped ATL 2-1 in the other semi-final. Classic warm up for midseasonlast_img read more

JFK Opens Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic

first_imgThe Management of the John F. Kennedy Medical Center Friday, May 2, formally opened an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Clinic at the Center. This clinic is to treat ENT illnesses.The clinic, which will be headed by a specialist from India, will help solve ENT cases that previously had to be flown out of Liberia for treatment because of the lack of facilities and specialists to treat them in Liberia.Speaking at the opening ceremony, the Deputy Chief Medical Officer of JFK, Dr. Abraham Borbor, said it was a dream come true to see the center once again open at the country’s largest referral center. He said with the limited resources, it is hoped that the head of the clinic will work with what is available and bring relieve to cases related to ENT.He called on ENT specialist, Dr. Mumtaz Umar, to also consider the transfer of knowledge so that other younger doctors can consider the field in order to bring about effectiveness.Dr. Borbor urged young Liberian doctors who are willing to learn to engage Dr. Umar, who according to him (Dr. Borbor) has a passion for imparting knowledge.Dr. Borbor remarks was followed by cutting of the ribbon by the Chief Medical Officer of the JFK Dr. Billy Johnson who lauded the Center for investing additional resources in awake of economic constrains to again open the ENT Center.He praised the hospital’s Deputy for Administration, Ms. Munah Tarpeh, who is also acting General Administrator, for opening the ENT center after nearly 13 years of closure.What ENT Specialists DoIn addition to graduating from medical school (usually four years), a board certified ENT specialist has completed at least five years of specialty training and passed a certification examination for the American Board of Otolaryngology. ENT specialists are experts in both the medical and surgical management of the following: Conditions of the ear: You may need to see an ear, nose, and throat doctor if you have an ear disorder or condition, such as a hearing impairment, ear infections, disorders that affect balance, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), or pain in your ear. ENT specialists can also treat congenital disorders of the ear.Conditions of the nose: ENT specialists often manage and treat problems that affect the nose, nasal cavity, and sinuses. These problems can affect smell, breathing, and physical appearance.Conditions of the throat: Disorders and conditions that affect the throat can affect speech, singing, eating, swallowing, and digestion. ENT specialists can diagnose, manage, and treat these problems.ENT is also referred to as Otolaryngology.  Physicians specializing in otolaryngology are called otolaryngologists or by the nickname “ENTs” or “ENT doctors” and often treat children with persistent ear, nose, and throat conditions to include surgery. Adult patients often seek treatment from an otolaryngologist for sinus infections, age-related hearing loss.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Oil production will have low risks to marine life – EIA

first_img…maintains low probability of oil spill reaching coastLiza Phase 2By Jarryl BryanThe results from the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) into the Liza Phase  2 development project has almost cleared ExxonMobil’s subsidiary from the presumption that its operations will cause damage to Guyana’s wildlife and the environment – that is, pending an independent assessment.The report’s findings are that damage will be “negligible to minor” when it comes to various categories. That is, save for damage to marine mammals, which the report does find will be moderate.According to the report, which was commissioned by Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (EEPGL), observations before and after the issuance of the Environmental permit show that large members of the cetacean family (particularly whales) rarely appear South of the Stabroek Block.The report states, “marine mammals have the potential to be impacted by two types of sound from planned project activities…Continuous sound from vessels and machinery operating in the (Project Development Area (PDA)) and comparatively louder, shorter-duration impulse sound from the Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and pile driving.”“Both the continuous sound and impulse sound sources would be loud enough to cause injury in the immediate vicinity of the source,” the report acknowledges, but adds that this would have no effect within approximately 10 metres of the vessels, 75 metres from the VSP, and approximately 1400 metres from the driven piles. The piles are driven at depths of more than 4920 feet.Even with those risks, however, the report pointed out the premise that marine mammals actively avoid these sounds because of the physical discomfort. It adds that mid frequency hearing mammals generally stay 700 metres away. The low frequency mammals, it says, avoid that portion of water by 1400 metres.“Both categories of cetaceans would be expected to avoid these areas for the duration of the pile-driving activity. Low frequency cetaceans (LFC) species, including many of the larger baleen whales and dolphins, and some mid frequency cetaceans (MFC) species, including toothed whales, will naturally remain outside of the area of potential effect because it will be deeper than their deepest recorded dive depths,” the report states.According to the report, species like Sperm Whales have been known to dive approximately 4000 feet in tropical and subtropical waters. But the report states that even if they met depths that would expose them to injury, they physiologically could not remain there for sufficient periods.Marine turtlesThe report states that marine turtles could be impacted by planned project activities, but that the impact is negligible to minor. It states that turtles, which are reptilian, are not as sensitive to underwater sound as mammals.“Marine turtles have been detected at a much lower rate than marine mammals prior to and since the Project was permitted, which suggests that the density of marine turtles offshore is comparatively low. Preliminary tracking data from a marine turtle telemetry study indicate that individual turtles may nest multiple times a season at Shell Beach.”The report adds that “during the period between nesting events, they generally remain close to the nesting beaches, which would reduce the probability of their encountering Project vessel traffic moving within the PDA or between the PDA and shore base in Guyana.”Oil spillsThe assessment also takes into account unplanned events, such as hydrocarbon spill, discharge of untreated wastewater from the FPSO, vessel strike of a marine mammal, marine turtle, or seabird; vessel collision; and onshore vehicular accident.“An unplanned event is defined as an event that is not planned to occur as part of the project, but that could potentially occur. Since these events are not planned, they are evaluated using methods different from those used for planned events, specifically taking into consideration the likelihood that an unplanned event will occur.”“EEPGL has identified 14 spill scenarios, including spills of different types of hydrocarbons (like) crude oil, marine diesel, fuel oil, lubricating oil, with several being applicable for spills at the shore base and on vessels in the Demerara River estuary (like) from a supply vessel) or in the Atlantic Ocean – eg, from a well, drillship, supply vessel, tanker, FPSO. The largest of these scenarios considers a loss of well control incident at the seafloor, releasing 20,000 barrels of oil per day for 30 days.”But the report noted previous findings that there is a low probability of an oil spill reaching the shoreline, in addition to the five to 15 days timeline for oil the reach the shore. It also noted its oil spill contingency plans. These plans, the company said, include its proper preparation of wells, inspected well control equipment, an Oil Spill Response Plan that sets out the response chain to an oil spill.“The OSRP clearly delineates the responsibilities of each entity that would take part in a response and describes how EEPGL would mobilise both its own resources and those of its oil spill response contractors, as well as notifying the Government of Guyana with respect to mobilising its resources,” the report states.Last month, Government had announced that an international firm, Ramboll US Corporation, will be contracted at a cost of $40 million to review the EIA. That sum will be footed by EEPGL, seeking environmental authorisation for the second phase of its Lisa project.It is understood that the Liza Phase 1 development project will produce about half the oil in the Liza field, Stabroek block. The Liza Phase 2 development project will produce the other half.last_img read more

Clark College, Fort Vancouver High literary fests feature local students, visiting best-sellers

first_imgNational Poetry Month was over at the end of April, but May is brimming with excellent words too — both verse and prose. Clark College and Fort Vancouver High School are both offering free literary festivals where you can absorb all sorts of writing by local and visiting scribes.Marie Bostwick, a best-selling author of historical and what’s termed “uplifting women’s fiction,” is probably the biggest name coming to Clark. An unabashed fan of happy endings, she’s the author of many heartfelt rustic-family novels — including her “Cobbled Court Quilt” series about the loves, friendships and families of quilting women. Bostwick is a frequent speaker at quilter conferences as well as writers conferences.If you want to attend Bostwick’s talk at noon on May 15, email anelson@clark.edu. Space is limited for this event.Also scheduled for Clark College’s “Subtext” literary festival are poet Roger Reeves; readings from the new edition of Clark’s annual literary journal “The Phoenix”; memoirist and weight lifter Lacy Davis; novelist Leni Zumas; children’s book author Kate Berube; and a reading by Clark students, staff and faculty.Meanwhile, Fort Vancouver High School’s festival is already underway, but the remaining lineup still features 13 professional writers appearing on May 15, May 17 and May 22; they’ll be joined by about twice as many student writers for some very rich and varied readings. This is the fifth year that teacher Ben Jatos has organized the growing literary festival, which he named “Orpheus” after the mythological Greek poet and musician whose art was so great, it charmed stones and even the gods themselves. Orpheus tried to raise his wife from the dead, too, but that didn’t go exactly as planned; even the greatest artists find their limits. Join the writers of Fort Vancouver High School as they test theirs.“It’s been thrilling watching kids share their authentic voice and tell their stories in front of their friends, family and community,” said Jatos. “That they get to share the stage with professional writers empowers them and validates their talents.”Scott Hewitt: 360-735-4525; scott.hewitt@columbian.com; twitter.com/_scotthewittlast_img read more